Join the Internal Selfie Revolution

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Have you joined the selfie revolution? Since Robert Cornelius took the first selfie in 1839, humans have been fascinated, if not obsessed, with snapping images of themselves. People now take selfies for many reasons, such as telling a story and capturing memories.

Did you know that people have been taking internal selfies since time immemorial, well at least several thousand BCE? It’s called meditation! It’s nothing mysterious or fancy. All you have to do is turn your camera inward and snap a picture of your current state of mind: What do you see?

Some early forms of meditative introspection included ritual dance, reciting mantra, and sitting crossed-legged under a Bodhi tree. Today, the meditation movement has captured the world’s attention. We are learning to turn our minds inward everywhere from the gym, yoga and tai chi class, the office and at our desks, in the classroom, and the boardroom.

Ready to begin your own mindfulness journey? It’s easy. Get your camera and join the Internal Selfie Revolution! Here’s how to start your practice today.

The Psychology of the Selfie

Why do we retake our image multiple times in order to get it just right before hitting send? On a superficial level, a selfie is casual, easy way to communicate a snapshot of yourself in-the-moment. It may be used as verification or to document change. However, a selfie also give us valuable information. From a selfie we can assess our:

  • Appearance
  • Thoughts
  • Emotions
  • Feelings

How to Take an Internal Selfie: The Basics

Now try turning your camera inside. Take a peek into your own brain. Let your Internal Selfie develop into an image or sensation – it might have a distinct shape, specific texture, or even a splash of color. Examine your internal snapshot as it manifests: try not to judge, reject, embrace or explain it. Just look at it directly and be curious!

Reprogramming Mind and Soul

Six Questions to Ask Yourself When Taking an Internal Selfie

  1. What’s going on inside of me?
  2. What thoughts and emotions are driving my current behavior?
  3. How do I feel about myself?
  4. Am I distracted or focused on what I’m doing?
  5. Am I nervous or calm?
  6. Do I feel tired or full of energy?

Internal Selfies Lead to Mindfulness

Sometimes, we are reluctant to turn our awareness inward because we are afraid of what we might find. Turning inward is challenging: criticism, judgment, and disappointment may arise. However, turning inward is a significant step towards mindfulness through awareness and self-acceptance. Taking that moment or pause before reacting or responding is the essence of the Internal Selfie and a reminder to live in the present.

Pause: Snap an Internal Selfie

  • Assess what you see, free from any judgment or concept
  • Do your thoughts, emotions, nervous system or feelings need any attention?
  • Take appropriate action to effect the change you want (more on this later)
  • Follow-up with a second Internal Selfie
  • Is the retake any different from the first Selfie? How have you changed?


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5 Challenges in Meditation

We hear a lot about the benefits of a regular meditation practice, but life – and our own minds can get in the way. When we do make time for our meditation practice, we can be easily distracted by some of its more common pitfalls. Here are five common challenges we face in meditation:

1. Impatience

Feeling the urge to be doing something else during a meditation session is probably the biggest meditation obstacle out there. Impatience causes us to end meditation sessions early, impedes our concentration and frequently makes us stop our practice altogether.

The key to counteracting impatience is to recognize the very existence of the feeling itself. If we feel the insatiable urge to do something else, it is important to acknowledge the feeling of impatience instead of giving into it. By acknowledging our impatience, we empower ourselves to effectively deal with it versus allowing it to rule us.

After acknowledging the feeling, we must remind ourselves that the benefits from a daily meditation practice will help us be more effective in everything we do afterward, including those activities that are causing our impatience. A calm, effective mind helps with decision making, anxiety and clear thinking.

Secondly, by identifying and isolating the feeling of impatience, we can then practice letting go of it, which gets to the essence of meditation—recognizing unproductive thoughts and letting go of them.

2. Lack of Time

So often we set intentions to meditate regularly, but our practice ends up getting tossed aside for “more important” things. We often feel like there are a million other things we need to do before we have time for our meditation practice.

The key here is prioritizing meditation by working on our perception of it. If we view meditation as a core part of our routine, like brushing our teeth or taking a shower, then missing meditation is no longer an option. We go through a routine to prepare our physical bodies for the day, so why not have one for our minds, as well?

3. Lack of Sleep

It is very, very difficult to meditate without enough sleep. If we begin meditating on little sleep, we often feel drowsy and end up dozing off. Not very productive! Also, a sleep deficit reduces our ability to concentrate and control our thoughts, which makes our meditation sessions far less effective. We are also less likely to meditate in the first place when fatigue undermines our resolve.

What’s the answer? Take a break and get some sleep! It’s okay to let go and allow ourselves the restoration we need to be successful.

4. Feeling “good enough”

Feeling good can be our biggest inspiration and our biggest obstacle. If we are not careful, feeling good can subtlety erode our resolve to continue with our meditation practice. The idea that because we feel good, we don’t need to meditate seems like it makes sense on the surface, but will ultimately undo our progress if we follow it. It can be as simple as waking up in the morning and deciding to lounge around and enjoy the morning instead of meditating because “we feel good, so it’s all good.” If we skip too many times we will regress in our practice and lose the positive mindset we cultivated.

Good is good, but great is even better. We can only reach great if we keep up our meditation. Focus on maintaining and improving the positive experience.

5. Stopping short

This is a very subtle pitfall in our meditation practice which can take a very long time to overcome if we do not realize it is happening. This occurs during a session when our mind finally settles into a place of calm and then we decide to immediately terminate the meditation because we think that we have achieved our goal. By terminating our session early, we are in fact missing out on the enormous benefits from continuing.

We can think of meditation in two steps. Step one is achieving the initial calm during a meditation and step two is sitting with that calm. By residing in a tranquil state we deepen our calm, improve our clarity and strengthen our feeling of relaxation for the post-meditation period.

How to Avoid These Meditation Pitfalls

Let Gaia guide you toward a stronger meditation practice. In the Here & Now Meditation Guide, you will create a solid foundation of new habits backed up by neuroscience.

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