The Hutchison Effect; Nikola Tesla Inspires A Bizarre Discovery


By: Tasha Shayne  |  Jul. 24, 2019

In his apartment, which doubles as a laboratory, Canadian inventor John Hutchison has surrounded himself with supplies purchased from Army-Navy surplus stores: oscilloscopes, digital readouts, switches, receivers, and various electronics. With these materials, he’s conducted countless experiments with electricity, attempting to duplicate the experiments of his hero, the famous scientist Nikola Tesla.

It’s through his efforts to recreate Tesla’s experiments that Hutchison claims to have accidentally struck brilliance, bringing about what’s termed “The Hutchison Effect” a highly-anomalous electromagnetic effect that causes the jellification of metals, spontaneous levitation of common substances, and other wondrous results.

The validity of the Hutchison Effect has been the subject of much debate in the scientific community, but Hutchinson has given his critics something to sink their teeth into, because he hasn’t been able to reproduce his purported successes.

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The Hutchison Effect Explained

The Hutchison Effect was discovered in 1979, while John Hutchison was attempting to recreate Tesla’s experiments. Upon activating Tesla coils, a static electricity generator, and other equipment, Hutchison felt something hit him in the shoulder. He discovered it was a piece of metal, and didn’t necessarily think twice about it. Picking the object up from where it had landed, he tossed it back to where he believed he’d previously placed it. Again, it hit him, sparking the curiosity that would eventually lead him to the discovery that fundamental frequencies can deprive various materials of their gravity.

Upon replication of this process, Hutchison claims that activation of these materials created a complex electromagnetic field causing heavy metals to defy gravity, sail up to the ceiling, and even shred into pieces. According to the Hutchison Effect website, it was the Canadian government that coined the phenomenon the “Hutchison-Effect” after a thorough investigation. 

But explaining exactly how this energy field works appears to be beyond Hutchison himself. The Hutchison Effect website goes on to say,  “As with much of the new-energy field, no one can say for sure. Some theorists think the effect is the result of opposing electromagnetic fields canceling each other out, creating a powerful flow of space energy. The Canadian government also reported invisible samples phasing in and out of existence.“

The ultimate theory touted by Hutchison’s followers, however, is that a theoretical electromagnetic wave enables his generator to connect with something called “zero-point energy.” Zero-point energy is a force defined in quantum field theory as having no physical particles and containing the lowest possible energy. It is the energy of a system at a temperature of zero.

But the John Hutchison Effect doesn’t stop with levitating metals — or ice cream, which he apparently also levitated. The Hutchison Effect serves as an umbrella term for numerous phenomena, including the spontaneous melting and fracturing of metals, or their spontaneous fracture, causing dissimilar materials to fuse (think wood and metal), turning metal to dust, and bringing about other unusual and unpredictable phenomena.

The Hutchison Effect Explained

The Hutchison Effect was discovered in 1979, while John Hutchison was attempting to recreate Tesla’s experiments. Upon activating Tesla coils, a static electricity generator, and other equipment, Hutchison felt something hit him in the shoulder. He discovered it was a piece of metal, and didn’t necessarily think twice about it. Picking the object up from where it had landed, he tossed it back to where he believed he’d previously placed it.

Again, it hit him, sparking the curiosity that would eventually lead him to the discovery that fundamental frequencies can deprive various materials of their gravity. Upon replication of this process, Hutchison claims that activation of these materials created a complex electromagnetic field causing heavy metals to defy gravity, sail up to the ceiling, and even shred into pieces. According to the Hutchison Effect’s website, it was the Canadian government that coined the phenomenon the “Hutchison-Effect,” after a thorough investigation. 

But explaining exactly how this energy field works appears to be beyond Hutchison himself. The Hutchison Effect website goes on to say,  “As with much of the new-energy field, no one can say for sure. Some theorists think the effect is the result of opposing electromagnetic fields canceling each other out, creating a powerful flow of space energy. The Canadian government also reported invisible samples phasing in and out of existence.”

The ultimate theory touted by Hutchison’s followers, however, is that his generator may connect with zero-point energy.

Zero-point energy is a theoretical, universal energy that exists in the vacuum state. Though it was once believed that all subatomic  movement ceased in the vacuum state, quantum physicists found that in fact there is movement and extensive amounts of energy. In fact, there is so much zero point energy that if it were condensed into matter, there would be more of it than the total mass of the entire universe. Is this the key to Hutchison’s mysterious effect?

 

The Hutchison effect on ice cream

But the John Hutchison Effect doesn’t stop with levitating metals — or ice cream, which he apparently also levitated. The Hutchison Effect serves as an umbrella term for numerous phenomena, including the spontaneous melting and fracturing of metals, or their spontaneously fracture, causing dissimilar materials to fuse (think wood and metal), turning metal to dust, and bringing about other unusual and unpredictable phenomena. 

Hutchison Effect Debunked

Hutchison has reproduced his effect, in YouTube videos, though the inventor’s claims have been the subject of controversy among the scientific community. No one — not even Hutchison, when in front of unbiased observers — seems capable of replicating the results to which he lays claim. 

Hutchison’s naysayers seem to have a number of ideas as to how he’s been successful in his ruse, ranging from using an electromagnet on the ceiling and placing metal inside of objects so that they’ll attach to the magnet. Then, using an upside-down camera, he could be turning off the magnet, making it look like the objects are floating toward the ceiling, out of the camera frame, when really they’re just falling to the floor. This particular theory is supported by the fact that the videos are always shut off before the objects stop levitating. 

And, of course, John Hutchison’s reputation is questioned by the fact that he operates out of his apartment, using materials anyone could pick up from the Army-Navy  store. Nor does it help that, since 1991, he admits to being incapable of reproducing his experiments. He’s also said that he has, on at least one occasion, faked footage of his effect after being unable to reproduce it. 

Hutchison Effect and 9/11

Of the most controversial claims that has erupted in relation to the Hutchison Effect, is that it has been said that the tragedy of the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center was the result of the scientist’s experiments.

To illustrate how this might be, Dr. Judy Wood, a former professor of mechanical engineering, juxtaposed a series of 9/11 anomalies that seem to directly align with the phenomena that resulted from John Hutchison’s experiments, such as strange effects on metal, including jellification and severe bending of beams; cars that were flipped upside down; and the changing of metals at an elemental level, such as steel that appeared to turn into iron at the scene of the attacks.

If 9/11 was the result of the Hutchison Effect, then who’s the prime suspect in one of history’s most notorious crimes? Perhaps the government. Those who believe that this note that the U.S. military and a team of scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratories paid Hutchison a visit in 1983 and filmed his experiments. Three years later, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service told him that his work was “a matter of National Security,” and that its defense contractor had his technology and was developing it. This and the numerous government raids made on Hutchison’s laboratory provide ample evidence that the government cared enough about the inventor’s activities to closely monitor his actions and confiscate his materials — and it’s still not clear why. 

Is truth as strange as fiction?

John Hutchison’s ardent supporters liken him to his hero, Nikola Tesla. And, who’s to say if they’re wrong? After all, if the story of Nikola Tesla has taught the world anything, it’s that some of the most influential geniuses are often labeled hoaxers. The validity of the Hutchison Effect seems compelling, especially in how it was accidentally discovered — perhaps John Hutchison stumbled onto something ground-breaking when following in his great hero’s footsteps. This certainly wouldn’t be the first accidental discovery in history — think of the telephone, the microwave oven, and even the post-it note. Unfortunately for Hutchison, however, greatness and due respect often come too late. 

 

For more on Dr. Judy Wood’s theory on 9/11 and the Hutchison Effect check out this episode of Beyond Belief:

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