Popular Cereal, Granola Found to Contain Unsafe Levels of RoundUp

Scientist testing gmo plants and seeds in biological laboratory. Note: fictional numbers on labels

You might want to think twice before pouring yourself a bowl of your favorite cereal or granola, as Monsanto’s likely-carcinogenic products have probably contaminated your breakfast. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide RoundUp has been found at unsafe levels in popular cereals such as Lucky Charms, Cheerios and Nature Valley granola, according to a recent study.

The study was published by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) – a philanthropic research group dedicated to studying the effects of toxic chemicals on children’s environmental safety. The group set a benchmark for safe levels of glyphosate in food products at 160 parts per billion (ppb), to test 45 conventional products and 16 organic products. Of those, 43 conventional products tested positive for glyphosate, while 5 organic products tested positive, though none of the organic products exceeded EWG’s safety benchmark.

The conventional products that tested high included Lucky Charms around 315 ppb; Quaker Dinosaur Egg Instant Oatmeal between 700 ppb; Quaker’s Old-Fashioned Oats between averaged 930 ppb; Nature Valley Granola Bars around 340 ppb; and Cheerios Whole Grain Oat Cereal averaged 497 ppb.

For a full list of the snacks and cereals tested for glyphosate look here.

EWG’s study was sparked by a recent lawsuit, which awarded $289 million to a man dying of cancer linked to his use of Monsanto’s RoundUp. Hopefully, this latest development will finally bring about the awareness needed for glyphosate-based products to be banned from use or highly regulated.

Seed: The Untold Story

EWG says there are more than 250 million pounds of glyphosate sprayed on American crops – primarily on genetically modified “Roundup-ready” corn and soybean. Since grains aren’t harvested when they’re green, farmers spray RoundUp on wheat, barley, and oats to dry out the crops, forcing them to die faster, so they can be harvested earlier. This is how EWG suspects unsafe levels of glyphosate are getting into popular food products.

Monsanto has a long track record of dismissing and covering up significant evidence that its products are linked to cancer by hiring former big tobacco lawyers, supporting sympathetic scientists in government roles, and spending tens of millions in lobbying.

According to the Guardian, the company’s recent loss in court found “clear and convincing evidence” that its officials acted with “malice or oppression” in failing to adequately warn of the risks associated with its products.

Glyphosate has been banned for use in 40 different countries and recognized by the state of California’s Proposition 65 and by the World Health Organization as a carcinogen. Monsanto, Quaker, and other companies named in EWG’s study defended themselves saying that the levels found are still below legal limits.

But when the company who’s selling the carcinogenic product spends millions lobbying the legislators and has former board members setting those legal limits, legal doesn’t always equate to safe.



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Mites, Monsanto Cause Colony Collapse Disorder; Is Fungi A Solution?

Something has killed honey bees in droves for the past 20 years leading to what’s known as colony collapse disorder. For a while, the culprit remained ambiguous, but now scientists are discovering that a number of anthropogenic factors, including Monsanto’s herbicide glyphosate, pesticides, and parasites may be to blame. Though these may seem like disparate problems requiring complicated solutions, there is one man who believes he has an answer that could save the bees—that man is Paul Stamets, and his answer is fungi.

Over the past several years, Stamets has become something of a rockstar in the field of mycology—the study of fungi—for his radical and pioneering work discovering the endless applications and influences mushrooms have on our world.

Since he began researching fungi in the 1970s, Stamets has received 12 patents, written six books, and been recognized by a multitude of esteemed institutions. There’s even a character on Star Trek: Discovery named after him—Lt. Cmdr. Paul Stamets.

Part of Stamets’ appeal stems from his Deadhead-turned-scientist persona that views fungi from a spiritual perspective, not just a materialist lens. Stamets admits his early use of Psilocybe cubensis, also known as “magic” mushrooms, became the catalyst for his fascination, leading to a lifelong journey studying the myriad mycelia that populate the planet.

Stamets’ discoveries have changed lives and now he hopes to parlay his mushroom knowledge into a comprehensive plan to save the bees, and in the process, maybe save humanity as well.

Colony Collapse Disorder

Colony collapse disorder is the phenomenon in which there is a mass exodus of worker bees from the hive, typically dying or fleeing from infection. These bees leave their queen behind with a few nurse bees to care for her, though their chances for survival drop significantly, especially as winter draws near. Scientists have identified several factors related to colony collapse, most of which stem from pathogens and chemicals that degrade bees’ immune systems.

And while we all know bees produce honey and wax, many don’t realize just how crucial they are to our survival as a species.

Bees are pollinators, and while this may seem obvious, many are unaware of just how essential bee pollination is to agriculture. When a bee collects nectar from a plant it picks up pollen and transmits it to other plants, allowing them to bear fruit. And a single bee can pollinate up to 1000 flowers a day.

This process is necessary for our agricultural industry, as about 35 percent of our food is directly dependent on bee pollination, while the other 65 percent is indirectly dependent. If bee pollination suddenly ceased, it’s estimated around $16 billion worth of crops would be affected in the United States alone.

And over the past few decades, beekeepers and entomologists have noticed massive drop-offs in bee populations globally. In a matter of a single year, states like Oklahoma lost as much as 85 percent of beehives due to colony collapse. According to the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, a third of all bee colonies have died each year since 2006. So, what exactly is causing this apiological pandemic?

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