US Navy Announces New Rules for Pilots to Report UFO Encounters

ufos flying at sunset 2

If there’s one thing we learned from the 2017 revelation of the Pentagon’s AATIP (or AAWSAP) program that studied military encounters with UFOs, it’s that they seem to happen a lot more often than we’ve been told.

And now that this unexplained phenomenon has become public knowledge, it seems the stigma surrounding them has lessened, as the Navy announced new guidelines this week for pilots to report encounters with unidentified craft.

Luis Elizondo, the former official who ran the $25 million Pentagon program studying unidentified aerial phenomena (UAPs), has been one of the louder voices attempting to attract public attention to the sheer number of cases encountered by naval pilots, as well as the lack of protocol in place for filing official reports.

“If you are in a busy airport and see something you are supposed to say something,” Elizondo said in an interview with Politico. “With our own military members, it is kind of the opposite: ‘If you do see something, don’t say something.'”

Much of the press around Elizondo stems from his involvement with To The Stars Academy (TTSA) – the research/entertainment/disclosure venture ostensibly seeking to prove the existence of extraterrestrials and their link to these unidentified craft – with its founder Tom Delonge claiming credit on Instagram for the recent change in the Navy’s policy.

According to Delonge, the Navy’s announcement is a direct result of his group’s efforts working “at the highest levels of the Navy, DOD and other Agencies to help create an architecture for dealing with the reality and National Security issues related to UFOs,” he said. “And yes, this is an admission by the NAVY that these Unidentified Aerial Vehicles are real.”

In its press release reported by Politico, the Navy even went so far as to admit that UFOs have been spotted and tracked in controlled military test sites.

“There have been a number of reports of unauthorized and/or unidentified aircraft entering various military-controlled ranges and designated air space in recent years,” the Navy said.

Pathway to Disclosure

But despite the extraterrestrial connection most people’s minds jump to when discussing these UAPs, UFOs, or whatever we’re calling them these days, Elizondo is always careful to frame the situation in terms of national security – likely one of the reasons the topic is now being taken so seriously. He still maintains that no one knows what these unidentified craft are, but that they deserve attention in the event it could be highly advanced technology owned by one of the U.S.’s earthly adversaries.

According to Elizondo, pilots often refrain from reporting them because they “don’t have a tail number or a flag — in some cases not even a tail — it’s crickets. What happens in five years if it turns out these are extremely advanced Russian aircraft?”

It’s now been nearly a year and a half since the New York Times first reported cases involving naval pilots’ encounters and aircraft carriers being stalked by UAPs for weeks at a time. The fact that these stories are still getting attention from the mainstream media, and branches of the military are rewriting policies, speaks to how real the phenomenon is.

Unsurprisingly, the Navy refuses to admit that its pilots have encountered extraterrestrial craft – it simply says it doesn’t know what they are. But would the Navy ever tell us what it is their pilots are encountering, even if it did know? Probably not.

Gaia show host and SSP insider Emery Smith, told us he doesn’t believe this will necessarily lead to any type of significant public admission from the Navy. “This is a really positive thing, the military stepping up and letting the public know that they’re going to be allowing pilots to report this. Even though they say that, I still don’t believe they’ll disclose much information to the public, unfortunately.”



The Senate Is Unhappy With the Intelligence UFO Report, Demands More

Avi Loeb on ET Arrival

Congress is doubling down on UFO legislation — first the House and now the Senate is demanding answers going back decades.

Members of Congress who are not pleased with the lackluster response from security agencies and the Department of Defense’s response to last year’s UFO-related legislation called for sweeping changes and oversight to the reporting of UFO activity. They just passed even stronger language in the Intelligence Authorization Act for 2023.

Mirroring the House legislation, the Senate would also create a “secure system” for reporting UAPs, as well as loosen the restrictions on, or release people from, non-disclosure agreements. It also calls for a deep dive into how UAP-related activities were handled by the government dating back to 1947. 

So what makes this bill so groundbreaking? Nick Pope served with the UK’s Ministry of Defense covering UAP activity.

“We now have some really strong language in the draft Intelligence Authorization Act for fiscal year 2023. The bottom line is that Congress is continuing to say to the DoD and intelligence community, ‘we want action on the UAP issue,’ and they are clearly not letting it go, and the language is robust. They are articulating a number of must-haves here that we have not seen before.”

Read Article

More In Paranormal & Unexplained

Our unique blend of yoga, meditation, personal transformation, and alternative healing content is designed for those seeking to not just enhance their physical, spiritual, and intellectual capabilities, but to fuse them in the knowledge that the whole is always greater than the sum of its parts.


Use the same account and membership for TV, desktop, and all mobile devices. Plus you can download videos to your device to watch offline later.

Desktop, laptop, tablet, phone devices with Gaia content on screens

Discover what Gaia has to offer.

Testing message will be here