11 New Hills Discovered at Gobekli Tepe Megalithic Site

Gobekli Tepe New Discoveries

Turkey just made an announcement about a major archeological discovery at Gobekli Tepe. Could this finally shed light on who built the world’s oldest megalithic site, and why?

First unearthed in 1995, the 11,000-year-old excavation site at Gobekli Tepe has yielded the most significant collection of stone pillar monoliths ever discovered. While most archeologists agree that the structure is the world’s oldest temple, they have long-debated the origins and motivations of its builders. The recent findings of 11, possibly 12, new sites around Gobkeli Tepe may provide those answers.

Andrew Collins is an ancient history researcher who has written extensively about the site.

“Gobekli Tepe is in many ways the best evidence that we have of a lost civilization—a pre-Ice Age civilization that existed worldwide and was probably wiped out by very harsh conditions and possibly some kind of comet impact about 13,000 years ago, and that the sole remnants of this went on to create Gobekli Tepe,” Collins said.

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Australian Fires Uncover Aboriginal Technology Older Than Stonehenge, Pyramids

We’re all familiar with the tragic sights of the recent brush fires that ravaged Australia. From Victoria and New South Wales, all the way up through Queensland and large swaths of Western Australia. Over 25 million acres of land have burned at a seemingly unstoppable rate.

It’s estimated one billion animals including birds, mammals, and reptiles have perished, while pollution from the fires has spread into major cities like Sydney and Canberra, even reaching as far as New Zealand and Papua New Guinea.

The world has been deeply touched by images of iconic Australian animals such as koalas and kangaroos struggling to find water and food and has responded to help Australia heal and rebuild. Many have regarded the Australian brush fires as a sign of climate change as well as a warning sign; while firestorms are normal occurrences in Australia, the size, scope, and timing of this latest disaster in a year already on record as being the hottest in Australia’s human history are unprecedented. 

But in the wake of the brushfires, Australian archaeologists and historians unearthed new insights that may show how ancient aboriginals technologies and lifestyles were significantly more advanced than once thought. 

The spread of civilization may be likened to a fire; first, a feeble spark, next to a flickering flame, then a mighty blaze, ever increasing in speed and power. — Nikola Tesla

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