The Interstellar Cloud is Bringing Space Weather to Our Solar System

interstellar_cloud

Could a thin layer of gas that is as hot as the surface of the sun affect Earth’s climate?

Our solar system, as it moves through space, is traveling through a cloud and potentially experiencing some turbulence. The Local Interstellar Cloud, or the Local Fluff as it is more colloquially referred to, is a thin layer of magnetically charged gas that is 30 lightyears across and as hot as the surface of the sun. So why hasn’t this scorching, nebulous layer of helium and hydrogen caused problems for us yet?

Luckily, our sun, in addition to providing us with the perfect amount of light and heat, has shielded us with a magnetic bubble that is pushed outward by the solar wind. This protective layer is known as the heliosphere and it is like a carapace for our solar system, keeping cosmic radiation and pesky interstellar fluff from fogging over our planets. But what if that protective bubble were breached, allowing for cosmic radiation to enter our solar system? We know that we experience some cosmic radiation on Earth that originates outside of our solar system, causing ozone depletion, unstable isotopes in our atmosphere, and radiation exposure at high altitudes. But we don’t know what the effects that cosmic radiation originating from the Local Fluff might have on us.

Compression of the Heliosphere

While the heliosphere and heliosheath, an area before the boundary to interstellar space, seem to be doing their jobs, there is a possibility that the Fluff is compressing our bubble. As our solar system passes through the Fluff, it becomes oblong, while simultaneously resisting the magnetic bubble of the Fluff. There is also the possibility that there are ‘cloudlets’ of significantly higher density gas within the Fluff. Could these higher density cloudlets make it through the heliosphere and into our solar system?

The average density of the Local Fluff is about 0.3 atoms per cubic centimeter. To put this into perspective, the density of the edge of Earth’s atmosphere is 12 billion atoms per cubic centimeter. At this extremely thin density, there isn’t much reason to worry about it penetrating our heliosphere, but if cloudlets of significantly higher densities came through, they could potentially burst our bubble. According to astrophysicists, these cloudlets could allow more cosmic rays to penetrate our solar system, potentially wreaking havoc on our climate. But we only have another 10,000 years before we pass through the Fluff and our cosmic sky clears.

 

Source: NASA

Interplanetary Climate Change

While anthropogenic causes of climate change are undeniable, there could potentially be additional outside factors at play, according to a Russian scientist named Dr. Alexey Dmitriev. This energy that is being emitted from the Fluff could be affecting all the planets in our solar system. Dmitriev believes that this energy is producing hybrid processes and excited energy states in not just the planets but also in the Sun. So, what are the consequences of this for life on Earth?

Dmitriev states that this excited state could accelerate a magnetic pole shift, it could affect ozone distribution in the atmosphere, and it could generally increase the frequency of catastrophic climate events. While this may sound apocalyptic, he says that this is a regular process and it is natural for Earth’s biosphere to undergo these changes. Essentially, Dmitriev says that these changes will create a necessity for adaptation of all life on Earth.

Whether Dmitriev’s prediction is prescient or overdramatic, we may soon have more data surrounding this phenomenon. NASA’s Voyager probes have almost breached the heliosphere to enter interstellar space, where the Fluff begins. The probes are currently in the heliosheath and able to measure the magnetic field of the Fluff. As they get closer they will hopefully be able to tell us more.



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Stargates and Hidden Portals on Earth and in Space

In 2015, NASA admitted that the idea of Earth portals — areas on the planet that instantly teleport human beings from one place to the other — are a reality that they have been studying for quite some time.

One of NASA’s spacecraft, the THEMIS, and cluster probes from Europe have amassed enough observational data to confirm that a magnetic stargate portal exists in many locations.

Usually these are found where the faraway geomagnetic field bumps up against the passing solar wind. The result is a direct pathway between the Earth and the sun.

In March 2015, NASA launched its Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) that, among other things, is tasked with studying these portals to gain a deeper understanding of them. Most of these are small with short lives, though others have been observed as gaping holes with sustained lifespans. Opening and closing numerous times during the day, magnetic forces mingle, allowing their crackling energy particles to flow between the Earth and the sun. These meeting points — called X-points by NASA — have been pinpointed by scientists using polar data.

The Bermuda Triangle

The Bermuda Triangle is probably the most famous stargate portal. Encompassing three vertices, the Bermuda Triangle — sometimes referred to as the Devil’s Triangle — is a large abyss that stretches between San Juan, Puerto Rico, Bermuda Island, and Miami, Florida. First noted in late 1950 or early 1951, the Bermuda Triangle was deemed to be a mysterious area in which huge military ships and planes were “lost” without any other plausible explanation forthcoming from the government or the military. In 1964, Vincent H. Gaddis argued that the Bermuda Triangle was the site of strange occurrences such as disappearing tanker ships and jets with the government being unwilling — or unable — to provide a reason or explanation.

The Philadelphia Experiment

The Philadelphia Experiment, also sometimes called Project Rainbow, grew out of the desire to cloak the U.S. Navy’s destroyer, USS Eldridge, so that enemy devices were not able to detect it. Built on concepts relative to stargate portals, the project relied on a technological application developed by well-known and respected scientific greats Nikola Tesla and Albert Einstein.

Testing started in 1943 and was successful to a large degree. In fact, some witnesses noted that they saw a green fog in the area where the massive ship once stood. Further experiments in late October resulted in the USS Eldridge vanishing from its shakedown cruise in the Bahamas. Simultaneously, sailors stationed 375 miles south at the Norfolk Naval Base in Norfolk, Virginia, reported the ship’s appearance for several minutes before it vanished.

Alfred Bielek, a former crew member on board the USS Eldridge, and Duncan Cameron, who would later work on the Montauk Project, jumped from the deck of the USS Eldridge when it was trapped in hyperspace and landed in the future.

Once they arrived at Camp Hero in 1983, they were tasked with returning to the USS Eldridge in order to destroy the equipment holding the ship in hyperspace. The pair did so successfully before leaping off the deck and materializing in the current year.

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