A 12-Year-Old Boy is Youngest Person to Achieve Nuclear Fusion

Jackson_Oswalt

Jackson Oswalt has become the youngest person to achieve nuclear fusion at the age of 12 years old. Through trial and error, and $10,000 of equipment purchased on the internet, Oswalt built a homemade nuclear fusion reactor in his room, baffling his parents and members of the scientific community.

Though now age 14, experiments Oswalt conducted two years ago were verified by the internet hobbyist group, Open Source Fusor Research Consortium (OSFRC). He beat out the previous record holder, Taylor Wilson, who performed the feat at age 14.

“The start of the process was just learning about what other people had done with their fusion reactors,” Jackson said in an interview with Fox News. “After that, I assembled a list of parts I needed. I got those parts off eBay primarily and then oftentimes the parts that I managed to scrounge off of eBay weren’t exactly what I needed. So, I’d have to modify them to be able to do what I needed to do for my project.”

Hailing from Memphis, Tenn., Oswalt said he decided he didn’t want to waste his time on video games or other typical adolescent activities, instead finding himself enamored with science and, more specifically, nuclear physics.

After reading about his predecessor, Oswalt decided he could beat Wilson’s record and began researching the gear he would need to build a high-volt, atom smashing, plasma reactor in his bedroom.

Jackson Oswalt youngest to achieve nuclear fusion

Jackson Oswalt next to his nuclear fusion reactor via FoxNews.com

 

Combing through the OSFRC’s online forums and working under the supervision of his dad, Oswalt built a 50,000 volt reactor in about a year, achieving the desired results of his experiment just hours before his 13th birthday.

Nuclear fusion is the same reaction that powers our sun and other stars, but on a much larger scale. In theory, a successful nuclear reactor could provide clean, unlimited energy to the world eliminating our reliance on finite fossil fuels that pollute the planet. Some believe this technology has already been realized and suppressed at the behest of corporate interests in oil and gas.

If a 12-year-old kid can create a nuclear fusion reactor in his room, why can’t the most advanced energy facilities in the world create one on a larger scale?

The trick to achieving successful fusion is to build a reactor that outputs more energy than is put in, and scientists at MIT have come close to building such a mechanism. In 2016, the university’s Alcator C-Mod tokamak reactor achieved a 16 percent increase from a 2005 record when it reached a temperature of 35 million Celsius for a period of two seconds. Though conveniently, funding for the reactor from the US Department of Energy ended the following day, despite their success.

More recently, scientists have begun to construct a larger tokamak reactor, which uses a toroidal apparatus to produce fusion in plasma, in southern France. This reactor will be 800 times the size of MIT’s Alcator C-mod reactor, but won’t be complete for another 15 to 20 years.

And while several other private firms are working on similar tokamak reactors of their own, its surprising there isn’t more government investment in this technology when it portends a future of clean limitless energy.

Is this because it’s actively being suppressed?

 

For more on suppressed technology check out Disclosure with Dr. Steven Greer: 



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What is a Stargate? Explore the Doorways of the Universe

Humans have long been obsessed with the possibility of alternate universes, and a way to instantaneously travel between this one and the next. This concept was popularized by the science-fiction TV show Stargate, and as recently as 2015, NASA admitted to having spent at least a decade researching access points to places outside our world, our universe, even beyond space and time as we know it.

The term Stargate means just that: an otherworldly door or portal to outside realms, hidden within Earth’s and space’s magnetic fields, waiting to transport the enlightened traveler to a place beyond current time limitations. While space seems to be the most likely location for these doorways to other universes, many places on planet Earth have also been attributed with special transportive capabilities, as well as noticeable shifts in energy, different frequencies, and unexplained lights or sounds.

But little to no scientific evidence has supported the theory of ‘wormholes’ in outer space, much less within the Earth’s atmosphere, until NASA’s Jack Scudder found a way to identify the elusive doorways floating between the Earth and the Sun.

Suspected Stargate Location in Space

Similar to an Einstein-Rosen bridge, or ‘worm-hole,’ the theory of formation of a space portal is that one occurs when space-time is distorted, either by the intense gravitational fields created by the collapse of a star, or by the mingling magnetic forces of the Earth and Sun crossing in space, enhanced by violent solar winds. Some of these portals are gaping holes for significantly sustained periods of time, while most are short-lived, yawning wide and re-closing several times in a day.

But Stargates can be difficult to find. Their reliable instability, elusiveness, and tendency to be tricky to spot can mean it will take years to locate one. There are no signs leading down this road, let alone pointing to it.

However, a plasma physicist, Jack Scudder, at the University of Iowa, has discovered a technique for spotting the elusive unpredictable portals. Scudder called these newly-discovered road signs X-Points, where the intersecting magnetic fields flowing between the Earth and the Sun propel vast amounts of charged particles out of the portal, easy to spot with the correct instruments and the right data.

Once Scudder was able to recognize the indications of a portal, he was able to find similar patterns occurring all over the place in the Earth’s atmosphere. Observed by NASA’s THEMIS spacecraft, they surround the Earth at a distance from 10,000 to 30,000 miles away.

Most of them seem to be located where the Sun and the Earth’s magnetic fields connect to form an unobstructed path, causing the area to pulse with charged particles that also create the Northern Lights and geomagnetic storms we sometimes witness here on Earth.

While not entirely certain what exactly these portals are, Scudder and his team remain optimistic that the answer is not beyond reach.

Stargates are a fascinating overlap of science-fiction and reality, and there are some who claim that we have access to portals here on Earth. Some locations are thought to be compass points on a map designed by sacred geometry and posses the ability to transport us to parallel universes. Among the earthly stargate sites, the most noted are the Stonehenge formation and the Bermuda Triangle, but several other locations are also attributed with being ancient alien portals.

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