Mysterious Object Falls from Sky, Drains 100-Year-Old Pond

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A woman living in a rural Tennessee town claims she saw something fall from the sky into a pond in her backyard, finding the pond was suddenly drained of its water. That resident, Patsy Wright, dismissed the idea that the drainage might be due to a sinkhole, as she says she saw something coming from the sky into the water, creating large waves, before the pond disappeared entirely.

Wright reported the story to her local Nashville NBC affiliate, which ran a report that included drone footage of the depleted pond she says had been there for over a century.

“When I seen them waves go up like it did (sic) and then they come back down. And I heard the splash. I mean it was a big splash,” Wright said. “I walked down here with my dog and sure as the world, no water. It was gone.”

According to reports, it was difficult to tell what the object was, due to the depth of the hole. It’s also unclear what happened to the water, though it’s assumed it was absorbed into the water table below, after the pond was struck.

“I know something hit it, because I heard it. I thought, I’m not imagining nothing. It’s there.”

Drainage of Wright’s pond

Some online were quick to connect the drainage of Wright’s pond with a similar account from the CIA-employed remote viewer Ingo Swann, who in his autobiography recounts being taken to see a triangular UFO, which subsequently drained a lake of its water.

His account describes being flown to an undisclosed location in the north (possibly Alaska or northern Canada) where he says, “That was my last sight of the triangular thing, but in that last moment I could see the water of the lake surging upward – like a waterfall going upward, as if being sucked in to the “machine!”

This might seem farfetched, however there have been other bizarre accounts of lakes, ponds, and other small bodies of water experiencing sudden drainage unable to be explained by geologists or other professionals. An instance like this occurred on a farm in Utah in 2014, where a bizarre crater appeared in a reservoir.

When interviewed about the strange cavity the farmer described it by saying, “My heck, I guess that’s Martian art!”

Experts from the Utah Geological Survey were unable to explain the phenomenon.

Often unexpected holes like these are attributed to sinkholes – a sudden collapse of the ground caused by the erosion of underlying rock layers typically consisting of limestone. It’s unclear whether a sinkhole could have been the culprit in the latest incident, but if Wright actually witnessed and heard something fall from the sky, a sinkhole could be easily ruled out.

 

For more anomalies falling from the sky check out Out of the Blue from Arthur C. Clarke’s Mysterious World:

Out of the Blue


Controversial Characteristics of Fractional Reserve Banking

Chances are, if everyone at your bank decided to withdraw the entirety of each of their bank accounts, the bank would not have enough money at its disposal to meet the demand. This is because banks commonly operate under a fractional reserve banking system. In other words, the bank uses your money however it wants, banking (ahem) on the fact that its account holders won’t protest. Unfair? It sure sounds like it. Stealing? The banks prefer to call it “borrowing.”

What Is Fractional Reserve Banking?

Many people believe that when they deposit money into a bank, the bank keeps all of their money on hand, in a vault, in cash. But this isn’t the way most banks work. According to Investopedia.com, fractional reserve banking refers to a system where banks only back a fraction of bank deposits with actual cash on-hand, available for immediate withdrawal.

This means only a fraction of the money you deposit into your account is required to be available for withdrawal at any given time. For most banks, that fraction is a mere 10 percent of your deposit. So, instead of putting $100 into the vault when you deposit a $100 check, only $10 goes in. That $10 is known as “reserves.”

Surprisingly, many banks are not required to even keep 10 percent on hand — and some aren’t required to keep any reserves at all. Any bank with less than $15.2 million in assets is exempt from keeping any reserves, and those with assets between $15.2 million and $110.2 million are only required to keep 3 percent. 

There is an incentive, though, for your bank to keep more of your money in the vault: The Federal Reserve pays out interest on all reserves and excess reserves. The interest is called IOR (“Interest On Reserves”) or IOER (“Interest On Excess Reserves”), and since 2009, it pays out 0.25% at an annual rate.

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