These 6 things add serenity to any room in your house

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We could all use a little more Zen in the place where we rest, recharge, and refocus: our homes! Now that you’ve detoxified your house, Feng Shui’d it up, and put it through the spring cleaning wringer, you can take a deep breath and find a little more peace in your home life with these tips, thanks to Oprah Magazine. The best part is that you can do these things in any room that you think could use more positive vibes, whether it’s your bedroom, your living room, or your dining room!

A Noise-Canceling…Rug

You probably never even noticed a spa’s greatest trick for creating a calming environment: “Soft fabrics, like mohair, help keep sounds from echoing,” says Stacy Shoemaker, editor-in-chief of Hospitality Design, which recognizes the world’s top hotels with its annual design awards. White sheepskin throws, rugs and covered pillows are especially popular right now: They’ve got all the plushness of a high-end fabric, but—starting at about $30 a piece—they won’t kill your budget.

An Odd Couple That Works Together

In a room with a mishmash of furniture bought, given and handed down, one of the easiest ways to keep things from looking jumbled is to figure out which pieces of furniture could work together—like a mirror and a chest that form a makeshift vanity—and paint them the same color, designer and The Nesting Place author Myquillyn Smith says.

A Signature Scent

Le Méridien commissioned a custom scent for its rooms, which smells a lot like leather-bound books. It’s familiar enough to comfort guests, and distinctive enough that they’ll associate it only with the hotel. Similarly, having a nontraditional scent that reminds you of your home—and only your home—can help you leave work, traffic jams and that rude woman at the grocery store behind as soon as you walk through the door.

A Bright Spot

Oh, to have gigantic windows and skylights. That may not be the reality for most of us, but with a few extra lamps—including an overhead light set to a dimmer switch—and boosting the lights so they’re brightest at mid-day, when the sun is at its brightest, could help you feel better (and create a home that looks like this). An October 2013 study in the Journal of Advanced Nursing found that hospital patients who were exposed to low levels of light 24 hours a day were more fatigued and reported higher pain levels than those who stayed in rooms with lights that adjusted. With just 40 people surveyed, there’s no guarantee that brighter days and darker evenings will improve your health, but it may be worth testing out for yourself.

A Glimmer of Warmth

While soft blues continue to be the most popular “peaceful” color, Zillow Digs’s Board of Designers survey found that a new shade has tied white for the number two spot: Gray. Unlike other calming colors, which tend to be cool tones, most people prefer light grays that have hints of red in them. Cool grays feel sterile, like an industrial warehouse, explains Jackie Jordan, director of color marketing at Sherwin-Williams. She recommends Mindful Gray or Anew Gray, and says she’s seeing them paired with pale aquas as an alternative to the classic blue and white.

Find Your Center

Start with the biggest piece of furniture in the room–that’s where your gaze will naturally rest. Flank it with two similar items, like a pair of side tables, wall art or lamps–but not pairs of all three, or you risk veering from symmetry to “sameness.” Because you’re going for serenity, not boredom.



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Does Your Heart Have a Mind of Its Own?

Until recently, modern science perceived the heart as merely a pump to regulate the flow of blood throughout our bodies. But across numerous cultures, the heart has historically been thought to have a much greater function that corresponds with our thoughts, emotions, and spirit.

When we speak or share feelings from a place of deep meaning or passion, we say we’re speaking from the heart or we’re trying to convey something that is heartfelt. This is no longer just an archaic maxim, but instead, one with factual backing. And science is now realizing that the heart and brain have more of a corollary, interactive relationship than previously thought … a relationship that has residual consequences on our bodies, and possibly even humanity as a whole.

Connecting Two Major Organs

The brain has typically been thought to be the control center for the body, sending directions through the nervous system to different organs, telling them how to behave. This is done through voluntary or involuntary action, like telling the heart to pump blood. But in reality, the heart sends more signals to the brain than the brain does to the heart, influencing emotions, memories, problem-solving, and high-level cognitive functions.

In fact, the heart has its own network of neurons. This network is so sensitive that our heart rhythms become highly ordered when we experience positive emotions, love, and joy. On the contrary, negative emotions and psychological activity cause erratic and jerky heart function, leading to inefficiency, lack of energy, and poor reasoning.

While massive fluctuations can shake up our energy and emotional levels, our heart rates already fluctuate very regularly, sometimes even every beat. Although these fluctuations are minute it shows just how sensitive our hearts are and how susceptible they are to change. These oscillations in our heart rate are called Heart Rate Variability or HRV.  HRV essentially measures the change in our heart rate with each beat. It is an effective way of being able to maintain and effect psychophysiological coherence or heart-brain coherence.

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