The Sacred Uses of Psychedelics in Human History

The Sacred Uses of Psychedelics in Human History

So much has been written over the past several decades regarding the historical use of psychedelic plants and the way they’ve contributed to the evolution of our species. Scholars, writers, and scientists — including researcher Graham Hancock, psychologist Timothy Leary, and ethnobotanist Terence McKenna — have proposed our very evolution is inseparable from the use of psychotropics and the way they’ve shaped the human experience.

And now we welcome a new wave of psychedelic researchers, including author Tom Hatsis, who has deeply considered the ways in which certain plants may or may not have been depicted in ancient and sacred contexts.

Hatsis might be regarded as a man on a quest to prove nature’s plants have the power to bring growth and insight beyond ordinary sources of knowledge and information, but he is clear to distinguish between recreational and sacred use of them. He is also armed with plenty of research that aims to clear up misguided conclusions about the role of psychedelics in history, including their appearances throughout biblical works of art.  

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Entheogenic Studies  

Hatsis focuses a great deal on entheogenic, or psychedelic, studies. The term entheogen was coined in 1979 by ethnobotanical pioneer Carl Ruck to describe psychoactive substances derived from plants and fungi, ingested as part of a sacred ritual to produce visions or gain mystical insights.

With an unusual depth of understanding, Hatsis points out that these once-holy plants fell into disrepute and recreational use in the 1960s, leading to criminalization and disfavor in the larger cultural context, as they were being used as party drugs by those who held no higher intentions other than a desire to become intoxicated.

Hatsis says mainstream media bias led to America’s first real judgment of plant medicines, putting them in a bad light and creating a taboo against their use. The negative repercussions of ubiquitous substance abuse overshadowed the sacred, historical, and spiritual use of these plants, and Western society is still reeling from this misstep.  

Psanctum Psychedelic Library  

Hatsis is the founder of the Psanctum Psychedelic Library, which he created on the heels of a wide range of psychedelic literature he researched, collected, and devoured. The library has cataloged everything from 15th-century ointments to CIA mind-control tests in the mid-20th century. His meticulous work continues to be fueled by his devotion to psychedelic plants and his quest to honestly and faithfully serve culture, history, and the planet. He brings his education, as well as his personal experience, to bear, after decades of expanding his horizons with an array of plant medicines and in his words, “lots—lots—of cannabis.”  

The Psanctum Psychedelic Library is a repository of psychedelic literature that has been largely overlooked — and even forgotten — by academics, healers, and laypeople. Hatsis’ research resurrects the experiences and ideas of Western intellectuals who rediscovered what shamans and mystics all over the world have known for centuries: The power of plant medicines provide access into the deepest parts of the psyche and soul. “These medicines,” said Hatsis, “get us closer to Gaia [Mother Earth]. For thousands of years, people have been using them to get closer to the divine.”  

Setting the Record Straight  

In his interview with George Noory, it becomes clear that Hatsis’ research clears up misconceptions regarding plant medicines, including suppositions made by those pushing for legalization as well as mystical seekers. Part of his contribution includes debunking research and teachings that misrepresent medieval paintings and suggest the use of certain psychedelic plant species were secretly encoded in early artwork.

The thousands of images often cited as proof of the use of holy mushrooms do not depict mushrooms at all, he says. Instead, they are images of stylized trees that can be easily traced to earlier concepts of trees in art. Medieval Christians, Hatsis says, were quite open about using opium, mandrake, cannabis, henbane, but did not mention using mushrooms. Considering the obvious use of all of these plant medicines, there was really no reason why artists would need to covertly place mushrooms in their religious depictions. 

He concludes that while it is okay to be enthusiastic about the use of mind-expanding plants, it’s not okay to make suppositions without solid evidence. 

Hatsis spends much of his time traveling, teaching, and working to show the profundity of mystical experiences whether naturally occurring or through plant medicines. But to be clear, he doesn’t advocate the careless consumption of these substances. On the contrary, he tells Noory, “I  don’t recommend anyone take psychedelics, but if you’re going to, I recommend having a reverential approach.” 

New Gene Discovery May Explain Rapid Human Brain Evolution

New Gene Discovery May Explain Rapid Human Brain Evolution

A revealing new study on human evolution and brain development has just been published. Could this lend credence to the stoned ape theory of brain evolution?

About 300,000-800,000 years ago the human brain experienced a massive and accelerated growth spurt. Scientists have offered many explanations for how and why this may have occurred, but a new study out of Boston Children’s Hospital focused on a fast-evolving set of the human genome called human accelerated regions (HARS). Previous studies have found about 3,100 HARS during brain development, but the team at Children’s Hospital determined one HAR gene PPP1R17 could be responsible for or play a significant role in, rapid brain development. Further, they discovered this works differently in humans than in other animals.

Ben Stewart, the host of Gaia’s Limitless series, said,”[T]hese regions of the human DNA may hold some kind of an answer at the rapid explosion of human neo-cortex because if you think of it evolutionarily, there’s not been one creature, at least on planet Earth, that has been studied that had any organ increase in size as large and as rapidly as the human brain did, so there’s definitely some unanswered questions there.”

“I’m pretty sure that these HARS regions are being looked at for something very unique in the evolution of the brain, and my own personal twist on it is this also might be important when we start looking at brian-machine interfaces and how the brain can potentially cause mutations to adapt to some kind of technology in the brain to enhance or evolve the human brain,” Stewart said.

How could this new discovery be related to the Stoned Ape theory?

“There’s a possibility that the Stoned Ape theory could lead into this. Now, the Stoned Ape theory was really popularized by Terence McKenna,” Stewart said. “Over time, you would have some of our ancient ancestors, hominids, that would be following behind bovine creatures, cows, and in the cow patties in the fields that would naturally, having followed these creatures around for hundreds of thousands of years or whatever it might have been, that they would have started eating the mushrooms, the psilocybin mushrooms that grow naturally in cow patties. These experiences tickling the language centers and other parts of the brain, bringing down the rigidity of the default mode network, and activating other communication hubs within the brain, that could actually explain the rapid explosion of the human neocortex.”

“In this article, they’re saying that these human accelerated regions act differently in humans than they do in primates or creatures like mice and ferrets that they’ve looked into now. So, potentially if there is some connection with the Stoned Ape theory, that psychedelics or psychotropics helped in the expansion of the human neocortex, and made us as, at least psychologically, so much different than the rest of the creatures on Earth, then there may be something to look at here.”

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