How to Access Your Subconscious Mind in 4 Steps

article migration image subconscious jpg

“Logic can take you from point A to point B, but imagination can take you anywhere.” – Albert Einstein

How to Access your Subconscious Mind?

Exercise: Access your Subconscious Mind in 4 Steps

  1. Relax

Relaxation is challenging for many of us, but it’s the gateway to opening and moving deeper within ourselves. Find a place where you won’t be disturbed. Sit or lie down in a comfortable place. If you’re sitting, use a cushion or a folded blanket underneath to help your sitz bones relax the hip flexors and knees. If you’re lying down, roll your shoulder blades down your back to support the heart. Place the hands at your sides palms up, and let the legs and ankles splay out. Relax the eyes with a soft gaze or close them, whatever feels most comfortable for you.

  1. Listen

Listen to the sound of your breath. If your breath is fast and choppy, slow it down by taking long, slow breaths. This calms the mind. Listen to the sound of your heart beating in sync with the natural rhythms of your body. The more you listen and focus on the breath, the more you’ll arrive in the moment, at ease, letting go of thoughts.

  1. Find Guidance

Using a guided meditation or a yoga nidra recording can be a powerful way to encourage visualization and deeper meditation. Better yet, seek out a teacher. Guided meditations will help you set your intention for what you want to work on, from dealing with trauma to fulfilling dreams, getting rid of bad habits, etc.

Guided meditations can often be found free through many different apps. Another option is brain wave music, which moves the hemispheres of the brain into alpha, delta and theta states, which help to de-program old thought patterns.

  1. Be Consistent

The more frequent you practice, the better. Find the time of day that resonates with you most and stick to it. Want to complement your practice even more? Restorative yoga is incredibly beneficial for relaxation.

Accessing your subconscious can help change your harmful thought patterns and take you out of feeling like you’re living life on autopilot. With a regular practice, you’ll enjoy a new sense of well-being, passion and purpose.

Learn how to access the subconscious mind with this E-motion toolkit full-length video

Testing message will be here
Accessing the Subconscious Mind

In our day-to-day lives, we’re constantly in an alert, conscious state of mind. In the beta state, our brains are very active as we navigate through the day, sometimes feeling like we are on autopilot as we form our experiences. In this active beta state, our brain is over-stimulated, which in yoga is often referred to as “the monkey mind.” Here, everything comes to us as doubts, fears, to-dos, emotions, and it can really cloud our minds and trains of thought.

Studies have shown that in our conscious state, we’re only using between 1 and 5 percent of our brain’s resources. So if we’re only functioning at 1 to 5 percent, how are we really living our lives with true purpose? Where’s the other 95 to 99 percent?

The answer is found in our powerful subconscious, where the alpha, delta and theta states provide us with calm, deep relaxation and dreamlike states. The subconscious is where the magic happens, and where the imagination is stored. This state is where we can de-program our thought processes of doubt and fear, and where we tap into our authentic self without the judgment and criticism of our conscious state interfering.

Dr. Bruce Lipton of Stanford University says that the subconscious mind “ultimately casts the deciding vote” on how much abundance, happiness and success you will experience. He also claims that the subconscious is “one million times more powerful” than your conscious mind.



Consciousness Is A Big Problem For Science

gsfv0705 thumb

Can Science Explain Consciousness?

Science has provided humanity with an incredible understanding of our physical world. But when it comes to the issue of the human mind, progress has been slow and littered with issues. Materialist science is attempting to prove that consciousness is merely a byproduct of the complex processes in the brain, and inseparable from the physical body. In simpler terms, your “mind” is the resulting process of neurons firing in your brain, nothing more and nothing less. Unfortunately, there is no actual neurological proof to support this idea, and for many who are deeply studying the question of the mind, these scientists are not looking in the right place, or using the right methods.

Alternative theories propose non-local consciousness: the idea that our brains are merely the physical conduit for the mind, not the source of its origin. These theories often explore fringe cases, such as near-death experiences, precognition, and psychic phenomena, in hopes that they can provide a more complete picture of the human mind. Of course, the majority of this evidence is not measurable to the extent that most mainstream, materialist scientists would accept. Responding to eye-witness accounts describing near-death experience, Neil DeGrasse Tyson said:

“Give me something that does not have to flow through your senses, because your senses are some of the worst data taking devices that exist, and modern science did not achieve maturity until we had instruments that either extended our senses or replaced them.”

Indeed, from the simplest microscope to the large hadron collider, it is impossible to imagine scientific progress without such instruments. But, if our senses are considered fallible as scientific instruments, what should we make of the mind we use to process and interpret this collected data? Human consciousness must be considered as unreliable as our senses, perhaps even more unreliable, as we know far less about the mind than we do about our sense organs.

This paradoxical reality is a serious issue for science: how can we study the human mind if the only tool we have at our disposal is the human mind itself?

In his book, Why Science Is Wrong, science podcaster Alex Tsakiris sums up the problem: “If my consciousness is more than my physical brain, then consciousness is the X-factor in every science experiment. It’s the asterisk in the footnotes that says, ‘We came as close as we could, but we had to leave out consciousness in order to make our numbers work.’”

Does Consciousness Exist Outside the Brain?

Part of this “consciousness problem” in scientific study is the “observer effect”: the theory that simply observing a situation or phenomenon necessarily changes that phenomenon. On a quantum level, physicists found that even passive observation of quantum phenomena can change the measured result, leading to the popular belief that a conscious mind can directly affect reality.

According to physicist John Wheeler, quantum mechanics implies that our observations of reality influence its unfolding. We live in a “participatory universe,” in which mind is as important as matter. Our belief in what is possible might actually create those possibilities, and it might reinforce the physical nature of our entire universe. If we do, in fact, co-create a shared consciousness, then our beliefs would necessarily influence our science.

Dan Siegel, a professor of psychiatry at UCLA School of Medicine, has argued for decades that we can not simply look inside the brain when trying to understand the mind“I realized if someone asked me to define the coastline but insisted, is it the water or the sand, I would have to say the coast is both sand and sea,” says Siegel. “I started thinking, maybe the mind is like the coastline. Your thoughts, feelings, memories, attention, what you experience in this subjective world is part of mind.”

Those exploring the outer frontiers of consciousness study are willing to take this idea much, much further. Ervin Laszlo, PhD is one of many thinkers who proposes the idea of a cosmic consciousness, describing it as a web that connects the entire universe. This field manifests locally in the human brain, theoretically meaning that the brain is able to connect to the consciousness of the entire universe. He calls this deep dimension of consciousness the Akashic Field, borrowing the term from ancient Hindu philosophy. In support of this theory, he presents numerous case-studies of near-death experiences, after-death communication, and recollections of past lives.

Laszlo writes:

We are beginning to see the entire universe as a holographically interlinked network of energy and information. We, and all things in the universe, are non-locally connected with each other and with all other things in ways that are unfettered by the hitherto known limitations of space and time.”

Those “known limitations of space and time” are the border walls of materialist science, and in the last century, quantum mechanics has begun to tear that wall down, one brick at a time. Quantum entanglement proves that tiny particles can communicate instantaneously in defiance of our known rules governing space and time. Many have hypothesized that if these tiny particles can remain connected outside of standard physical means, than the entire universe is inherently connected, as Laszlo and others have suggested.  And while that may someday be proven true, we have barely scratched the surface when it comes to the quantum implications of the mind.

Although there is extensive evidence for non-local consciousness, it is rarely embraced by mainstream scientists because it can’t be measured using currently available technology, and that makes significant progress challenging. Accepting non-locality forces the rejection of a purely materialist worldview, and that is a huge disruption for our current scientific paradigm, which dominates consensus thinking on how we understand the world. Yet, the study of consciousness is slowly forcing materialistic science to admit it may not be able to explain everything.

As Nikola Tesla famously said, “The day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence.” The study of human consciousness could be the motivating factor pushing us towards that new frontier.

Read Article

More In Expanded Consciousness

Our unique blend of yoga, meditation, personal transformation, and alternative healing content is designed for those seeking to not just enhance their physical, spiritual, and intellectual capabilities, but to fuse them in the knowledge that the whole is always greater than the sum of its parts.


Use the same account and membership for TV, desktop, and all mobile devices. Plus you can download videos to your device to watch offline later.

Desktop, laptop, tablet, phone devices with Gaia content on screens

Discover what Gaia has to offer.

Testing message will be here