Broga: 6 Things Every Man New To Yoga Must Know

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If you’re a man thinking of taking up yoga, or you’ve just started, then you must read this. It will save you time, confusion and even a bit of embarrassment.

Eyes Wide Shut Guys, when in down dog, learn to close your eyes and get into the pose. Why? One, to feel your way into a deeper stretch. Two, and perhaps more importantly, if you’re in front of a woman and she’s moving through her vinyasa, you could be making it awkward. You may want to be staring at your belly button, but trust me, those eyes may wander and make someone feel uncomfortable.

Kiss My Asana. When you’re in prasarita (a wide-legged forward bend) and you’re in a full class, please be considerate. Stagger your position with your neighbors, and as recommended in the point above, close your eyes. You also want to make sure you’re giving your female neighbors plenty of space coming in and out of the pose, just in case it looks like you’re trying to be a little too… neighborly.

Turning Perspective

Catch an eyeful. When you’re starting out in yoga, more likely than not, you’ll be in regular exercise clothes rather than yoga gear. If so, choose wisely. There are a lot of poses in yoga where you will be either sitting or standing with your legs apart. Trust me, neither you nor the person next to you wants to see more than they bargained for.

Don’t let it all out. Learn to understand your body. And specifically, how you digest certain foods. Before starting yoga, it never occurred to me that what I ate might cause flatulence (except for some obvious offenders, naturally!). In yoga, there’s a lot of twisting and bending, and all that rotation can quite literally squeeze the air right out of you!

Figure out what foods give you gas (for me, it was almonds – especially if unsoaked!). And if it does come out and it’s a silent but violent one (oh, forgive us!), then forget the ujjayi breathing and breathe out as hard as you can through your mouth. If it’s a loud one, then act like nothing’s amiss!

Forget the bar. When I started yoga regularly, I was the only guy in the class for the first six months. My classes were at a traditional gym, and it always amazed me that half the guys working out were obviously trying to get a hard body so they could pick up women at the bar later (a gross generalization, I know!).

All the while there’s plenty of great women right in their very gym! In no way am I encouraging you to go to yoga for the women, but look at it this way: if it’s a case of spending an hour at the gym surrounded by sweaty, testosterone-seeped men or spending an hour surrounded by dextrous women who are in tune with their minds and their bodies… the choice is yours.

Don’t deceive yourself. Most men I’ve met who’ve never done yoga or have no real concept of it, think it’s easier than it is. It always surprised me to see guys who could deadlift their body weight not be able to hold downward dog for even a few seconds! Don’t fool yourself into thinking yoga is easy. It’s as hard or as easy as you want it to be, but I’ve seen even the “easiest yoga” beat the toughest dudes.

So men, if you want a tough workout that can lay a solid foundation for all other workouts you do (I still do Crossfit, cycling, and other team sports), then grab a mat, some concealing shorts, eat sensibly, close your eyes and jump straight in. You’ll love it!



How to Choose a Yoga Teacher

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A notable issue for new yogis is the selection of a teacher. It used to be that we found ourselves driving by a school in our local area and attended it without much thought, hoping for the best. Now we have many options within local areas and online. It can feel quite overwhelming to know where to go and what to do but I have some guidelines that can help.

First let’s go over two important points:

  1. Train with more than one teacher. You don’t want your whole practice to rely solely on one teacher or teaching, only to find it disappear or be knocked off of a pedestal for you if some kind of drama or emergency happens for a teacher. Let your practice be YOUR practice.
  2. The teachers you choose now may not be the teachers you choose 6 months from now. Learn to flow with your practice as it evolves. Though it is best to find a main teacher or teaching to focus on, you have to sample many to find the one for you.

With this in mind, let’s discuss how to select a core teacher for your practice. The four main things to look for when selecting a teacher are: Personality, Vibe, Commitment, and Background. Too often we look at a teacher’s background before we look at anything else and make a decision to attend class based on that alone. Yes this is important, but when it comes to something so personal as yoga training (and your ability to stick with it!) you should strive to find someone with a personality and vibe that fits well with you first. When you feel a connection to a teacher, you can fully get involved in the class and have an experience, instead of just learning a set of movements.

For example, I LOVE quantum physics but if the top expert in the field is grumpy and negative, I will not enjoy training with him and may even give up my love for the field if I try to do so. For me heart and balanced openness is key.

Of course, no one is perfect, but be mindful of how you feel with certain teachers. Some people really love being pushed to their limit and will do best with strong ‘in-your-face’ teachers. I have a colleague who likes worldly yet negative people, he says they are ‘realistic’. So he likes hearing his teacher say “This pose ain’t gonna give you enlightenment, but you will feel a little better, hopefully.”

  • So what’s key for you?
  • What is the first thing you notice about someone?
  • What is the first thing you notice about a teacher?
  • What is important to you about who they are?
  • What makes you feel comfortable around someone in authority? (A lot of stuff can come up in yoga class so you need to feel comfortable).

Then look at their commitment. Are they committed to helping students? Do they seem to enjoy teaching? Are they available in the class, which means paying attention to students? (Online this means – they pay attention to the fact that there are people behind the camera as well as in the room). Do they read yoga teachings and do things to serve their personal practice? If they have reached a high level in their practice, do they serve their community?

Now look at their background. If the class is mostly about physical poses then you do want to know where they trained. You want to feel comfortable that they have an understanding of anatomy and how to work with those who have injuries. Always take care of yourself first, and speak up if you feel any pain. A good teacher will welcome questions.

Also, if you use these guidelines you won’t miss out on an amazing beginner teacher. Times are changing and some newer teachers really do have a lot to offer. It’s all about you and what you need.

My over all suggestion is to select a main teacher, and have other teachers that flow in and out of your yoga life. Sometimes we learn who we are by seeing who we are not. If you are all into power yoga, give a calm slow style a try too once in a while. If you get “triggered” or upset in a different type of class then there just may be something there that you need to work on. Be flexible in your teacher choices as well as in your poses.

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