Dyson Spheres Key to Find Alien Civilizations Higher on Kardashev Scale

Alien mega structure, Dyson sphere around a distant star

Searching for intelligent life in the universe? Then look for their energy source. An update on the hunt for Dyson Spheres.

In June of 1960, astrophysicist Freeman Dyson published his paper Search for Artificial Stellar Sources of Infrared Radiation in the journal Science. In it he argued a way to detect intelligent life in the universe by finding their energy signature that would be created by, he presumed a highly advanced technology.

He wrote, “If extraterrestrial intelligent beings exist and have reached a high level of technical development, one byproduct of their energy metabolism is likely to be the large-scale conversion of starlight into far-infrared radiation.”

Dyson, who died one year ago this month at age 96, believed that an advanced technology would harness solar power from a star with an array of solar panels. He explained in a 2003 interview that he once described it as a biosphere, but since then this theory has been known as a Dyson Sphere.

Dr. Seth Shostak Sr. Astronomer at the SETI Institute explains, “If you’re looking for E.T., if you’re looking for intelligence elsewhere in the universe, you’ve got to figure there are societies out there that are way more advanced than we are, you know the universe has been around for a long time. And they may have constructed something like a Dyson Sphere, or more accurately a Dyson Swarm, or something we can see. And there have actually been searches for alien Dyson Spheres.”

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Do Thousands of Alien Contact Accounts Share Same Message?

Though UFO sightings have been traced to the days of prehistoric man — with ancient drawings of spacecraft, mysterious symbols, and humanoid creatures depicted on cave walls all over the world — the overwhelming number of encounters are only now starting to receive the attention they deserve. UFO abduction stories and alien contact have poured into the mainstream for decades, even while those who claim to have had these experiences find themselves as targets of social mockery.  

UFO Abduction Experiences

Detractors who disbelieve abduction experiences often fail to take into consideration the character of the individuals who claim to have been abducted. A vivid stereotype stands in the way of fair treatment for experiencers: a delusional hillbilly at a rural bar rambling about far-fetched stories, or a drug-addled person ranting to no one in particular in the middle of a populated city center. But these abductee tropes are unfair and antiquated.

Giving actual credence to contact claims are the accounts of respected professionals who’ve come forward with their own stories, including military personnel, media personalities, and political figures. There are many people from all walks of life who have reported abductions and contact, such that a new generation of dedicated researchers has emerged, interested in learning more about these vivid and often terrifying experiences. Meanwhile, a number of psychologists have attempted to understand the lingering trauma and emotional scars of these abductees who work to cope with the ensuing trauma and disruption in their daily lives.

Harvard psychiatrist John Mack observed that the fear of social rejection and invalidation can often be more traumatic to an abductee than the actual experience of abduction. He said, “Every other culture in history except this one, in the history of the human race, has believed there were other entities, other intelligences in the universe… why are we so goofy about this? Why do we treat people like they’re crazy, humiliate them, if they’re experiencing some other intelligence?”

Similarly, physicist and UFO researcher Stanton Friedman noted, “I check all my audiences [on the lecture circuit] and find that, while in agreement with polls, 10% have had a sighting but only 5-10% of these witnesses have been willing to report what they saw. Biggest reason? Fear of ridicule.”

 

L. Harvard Psychiatrist John Mack   R. Physicist Stanton Friedman

 

Photographer Kim Carlsberg was a few days into working on the set of the hit television show “Dallas” when she went home and saw her first UFO, which she dubbed the “Moon Over Malibu.”

A few weeks later, Carlsberg went to bed and woke up in a spacecraft, which would be the first of a series of abduction events that continued for seven years. During abductions, she says she was the subject of experimentation and claims to have been impregnated to create hybrids of aliens and humans. She says she has learned profound spiritual lessons, having been shown the oneness of the universe and all of its species. And she reports a resounding mission among the extraterrestrials “[T]hat it is time to save Mother Earth from her inhabitants.”

Carlsberg’s first book, “Beyond My Wildest Dreams,” discusses her personal UFO abduction story, while her second book, “The Art of Close Encounters,” serves as a forum for 150 people to tell their UFO abduction stories.

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