The Healing Power of Ayurvedic Self-Massage

article-migration-image-Abhyanga.jpg

According to Ayurveda, the holistic tradition from India, Abhyanga or Ayurvedic massage is an integral part of the daily routine recommended for overall health and well being. It is a unique technique in which comparatively large amounts of medicated oils are applied to the body. Such massage helps to remove the accumulated stress and toxins in the mind and body, increases circulation to the nerve endings and promotes increased stamina throughout the day. It increases mental alertness, tones muscles and lubricates the joints.

One important benefit from Abhyanga is the stimulation of the [lymphatic system]/article/yoga-lymphatic-circulation). Lymph provides the nerves with receiving and transmitting signals. It also helps develop antibodies that are important for the immune system. By rubbing the joints in a circular motion, circulation is enhanced and rubbing the joints in a circular motion secretes fluid from the lymph nodes. This causes more protein, glucose, minerals, oxygen, and antibodies involved with the lymphatic system, to circulate in the blood.

Unlike massage oils used in the west, Ayurvedic oils are specially crafted medicinal substances that can be used both internally and externally. The traditional procedure to make such oils is a labor intensive process and requires the skill of a master Ayurvedic pharmacist; who slowly decocts medicinal plants, and other natural substances, into heat-stable oils at low temperatures. Ayurvedic herbs and botanical extracts recommended for skin and muscle-toning are selected and blended into a pure cold-pressed sesame oil base, according to age-old methods using special clay fire places and pure copper vessels. The resultant oil is then filtered and transferred to another copper vessel for settlement. Once it is settled and cooled by natural method, the oil is packed and has a shelf life of five to ten years, without any addition of chemical preservatives.

These traditional oils are a striking contrast to what many companies in the west currently market as ‘Ayurvedic oils’, which are nothing more than carrier oils that feature various essential oil blends.

Traditionally, sesame oil is used as base oil in a majority of the Ayurvedic preparations, due to its antioxidant properties; it also has the ability to penetrate through the subtle channels of the body. At times coconut oil is substituted due to its palatability. However, coconut oil is mostly used for external application; often used for children, as it is comparatively light.

How does one use Ayurvedic oils in their daily self-care routine?

Dip your fingertips into the warm oil and apply it lightly to the entire body. Wait for a few minutes and then apply even pressure with the palm and finger; massage in circular motions over rounded areas, such as head or joints, and straight strokes on straight areas, such as your arms and legs. Do not apply heavy pressure on sensitive areas such as abdomen or heart. Relax for ten to fifteen minutes after the massage, and then follow with a warm bath or shower.

What medicinal oils should one use for self-massage?

It is important to pay a special attention to the current state of health, when one is deciding which oil to use for daily self-massage. According to Ayurveda, the health of the body is dependent upon the activity of three psycho-physiological principles, or Doshas called Vata, Pitta and Kapha.

Vata dosha pertains to all movement in the mind and body, and represents the element of air and ether. Vata is considered the leader of all three doshas so it is important to keep Vata in balance. Vata is responsible for the neurological system and motor functions. Imbalance is commonly expressed as mental and physical agitation: dryness of skin, sensitivity to weather and weakened digestion. Ayurvedic Vata oil prepared with herbs like ginger, calamus, and costus, work to nourish, calm and pacify the body; alleviating symptoms of dryness, sensitivity, and pain.

Pitta pertains to metabolism, and transformation in the mind and body. Pitta represents the elements of Fire and water. Pitta is responsible for metabolic processes in the organs and tissue systems, in addition to the cellular metabolism. Imbalance is expressed as: skin sensitivity, anger issues, excess heat, irritation and inflammation. Pitta Ayurvedic oil has a cooling effect, to let excessive heat out of the body.

The last type of dosha is Kapha. Kapha pertains to structure and lubrication in the mind and body. Kapha represents element of Water and Earth. The body form and structure, inclusive of fluids, fats, muscles, bones, etc. come under Kapha. The imbalance is expressed as weakened circulation, body pain, weight issues, nasal and other congestions. Respiratory systems are more prone to Kapha imbalances, which results into phlegmatic disorders. Kapha Ayurvedic oil with herbs like Bishop’s Weed, Arjuna, cardamom and Camphor help healing these disorders.

For the individuals with more balanced health, use Tridosha oil to maintain good health. Ayurvedic treatments seek to balance our constitution with prevention and awareness of self. Let us all take the intelligence of the universe and match it with the intelligence of our own body for a healthy life.



Spinning the Seven Sacred Centers: Ayurveda And the Chakra

The popular seven chakra system is well known in the West. Chakra, meaning vortex or wheel, are the sacred centers of spiritual transformation. Everything from clothing, home décor, and oracle cards sport the seven subtle centers with their associated rainbow of colors. Popular western literature corresponds each of the chakras with a fundamental human need. The root chakra, or Muladhara, is associated with the need for survival.

The second chakra, Swadisthana, is associated with the need for emotional flow, desire, and sexuality. The third chakra, Manipuri, is associated with self-worth. The fourth chakra, Anahata, is associated with love. The fifth chakra, Vishudhi, is associated with the need for expression. The sixth chakra, Ajna, is associated with insight and intuition. And the 7th or crown chakra, Sahasrara, is associated with connection to the divine.

However, ancient scriptures on the chakras such as the 16th-century text, Sat Chakra Nirupama, do not associate the seven chakras with fundamental human needs. This association was, to my knowledge, first made by Carl Jung in a series of lectures that have been republished as “The Psychology of Kundalini Yoga”(1932).

Likewise, the association of rainbow colors (red for the 1st chakra, orange for the 2nd and so on up to purple at the crown) was made first in the 1970s in a book titled “Nuclear Evolution: Discovery of the Rainbow Body,” by Christopher Hills. Ancient Sanskrit and Tibetan texts on chakras and the subtle energetic body (also known as the Pranamayakosha) have various numbers of chakras and a variety of color schemes that do not follow the “ROYGBIV” rainbow-schema.

For better or worse, the seven chakra system has become reified in yogic culture; the seven chakras system is the “standard” system with which most students and teachers of yoga are familiar with. Many students and teachers of yoga may also have some familiarity with Ayurveda, the “Science of Life.” Ayurveda is a system of earth-based holistic medicine that was originally developed in ancient India but has evolved for contemporary application. Ayurveda uses three archetypal categories, called doshas, to understand balance in the body.

These categories are Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. Vata is like air and ether. It is light, dry, and cold, and responsible for everything in the body that moves, communicates, and transports. Pitta is like fire. It is hot and slightly damp. Pitta is responsible for digestion, metabolism, and transformation in the body. Finally, Kapha is similar to earth and water. It is slow and stable. Wet and cold. Kapha is responsible for our stability, immunity, and strength.

Read Article

Related Articles

More In Lifestyle

Our unique blend of yoga, meditation, personal transformation, and alternative healing content is designed for those seeking to not just enhance their physical, spiritual, and intellectual capabilities, but to fuse them in the knowledge that the whole is always greater than the sum of its parts.


Use the same account and membership for TV, desktop, and all mobile devices. Plus you can download videos to your device to watch offline later.

Desktop, laptop, tablet, phone devices with Gaia content on screens
Testing message will be here