How to Avoid Wrist Compression in Yoga

wrist bones injury

Most of us don’t give much thought to our wrists – until they start aching, that is. If your job keeps you tied to a keyboard all day, you might experience repetitive stress injuries to your wrists. Labor-intensive jobs can also result in wrist compression and discomfort, especially if you’re carrying heavy objects. To stay on the mat and keep the pain away, use these tips for healthier, more stable wrist joints.

Tips to avoid compression

 

  1. When you do weight-bearing yoga poses, keep your wrists as far apart as your shoulders. You’ll create a straight line that allows all of your muscles and joints to support one another. You’ll find it easier to make controlled movements without relying on your wrist or shoulder joints to pick up the slack.
  2. On the mat, spread your fingers and press the pads of your fingers into the material. It might feel strange at first, but you’re helping to distribute the weight and support your wrists. If you’re facing forward, your middle fingers should point ahead of you.
  3. You might find yourself neglecting your thumb. It’s easy to do, but your thumb can actually help you find balance and strength. Press the side of it into the mat so it stabilizes your wrist during weight-bearing poses. Again, you might feel awkward at first, but practice will make this technique second nature.
  4. Start with simple yoga poses that allow you to focus on your body and what it’s telling you. Don’t try more advanced poses until you have the hand position down. If you’re struggling to perform the actual pose, try modified poses so you’re not putting your body through too much stress. For instance, do downward-facing dog against a wall instead of on the mat.
  5. Start with simple yoga poses that allow you to focus on your body and what it’s telling you. Don’t try more advanced poses until you have the hand position down. If you’re struggling to perform the actual pose, try modified poses so you’re not putting your body through too much stress. For instance, do downward-facing dog against a wall instead of on the mat.
Wrist Safety in Yoga Poses


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Science Agrees; Yoga Has Significant Effect on Cellular Health

It’s no secret there are innumerable health benefits to practicing yoga. Incorporating different elements of yoga into your life can result in profoundly positive changes to your mental and physical state. But what if implementing these yogic practices could actually affect your cellular composition? This might come as no surprise to swamis and devout yogis, but now science is beginning to find evidence that this may be true in both quantum and physiological studies.

Changes at the Micro Level

Our bodies replicate and produce new cells at a rate of roughly two million per second. Over the course of a day, that adds up to hundreds of billions of new cells. Aside from growth, many of these cells have different roles, often producing different proteins needed for necessary bodily functions. But with so much of this cell growth occurring, there is plenty of opportunities for mistakes and mutations to occur.

Of course, our bodies have systems for repairing faulty cells, but the process can go one of two ways. When a cell is found to be mutated, it is essentially told to destroy itself. These cells contain substances that can be harmful if expelled suddenly in a process called necrosis. Certain cellular substances can be toxic to other cells around them leading to inflammation and other negative side effects, known as cytotoxicity. But when this cell death occurs in a controlled process called apoptosis, the cell is contained with none of the potentially harmful material escaping and interacting with other cells.

Cell necrosis can be caused by a number of things, ranging from physical trauma to toxins and pathogens. And when our bodies experience illness and disease, the whole process of cell renewal can become inhibited and bogged down. Cell growth and repair can also be hindered by heat and stress.

A change in just a few degrees can lead to the unraveling of cell proteins and their subsequent death. Stress from environmental factors can also affect us at a cellular level, to the point that it can have a negative impact on hereditary traits passed down to our children. So, what can we do to prevent this?

Read Article

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