New Study of Cave Paintings Say Ancient Man Understood Astronomy

Caveman painting in a cave

A reinterpretation of one of the world’s most famous primitive cave paintings seems to show our ancient ancestors had a much stronger grasp on astronomy than we’ve given them credit. According to a recent study, cave paintings in France depict animals that represent the constellations, showing the artists who drew them were aware of the precession of the equinoxes — a discovery not thought to have been made before Hipparchus of Ancient Greece.

Of the paintings in question, researchers Martin Sweatman, Ph.D., and Alistar Coombs studied an image titled, “The Shaft,” which portrays a collapsing bird-headed man, a bison eviscerated by a spear, a horse, and a rhinoceros in the Lascaux caves of southern France’s Dordogne region.

In the past, this scene was interpreted as a shamanic ceremony or the scene of a hunt, however the exact meaning has been widely disputed as depictions of men were incredibly uncommon in this era. But according to Sweatman and Coombs’ latest study, the paintings show not only a more primordial understanding of astronomy, but also religion, science, and mathematics.

By comparing radiocarbon dating of paint samples to the position of constellations in the sky when the art was created, the researchers were able to match specific animals with correlating constellations of the solstice and equinox. They used this same method at similar archeological sites, including the ruins of Göbekli Tepe and Catalhöyük, as well as the famous cave art of Chauvet and Altamira.

The two also said they believe the Lascaux paintings commemorate a comet striking Earth, correlating with what they believe to be the cataclysmic impact event that marked the beginning of the Younger Dryas period – evidence of which was recently found in the form of a 19-mile wide crater beneath a Greenland ice sheet.

In addition to these sites, the researchers incorporated the Lion-man figurine from the Hohlenstein-Stadel cave in Germany, which dates back 38 thousand BCE and is considered to be the world’s oldest sculpture – they believe it too, may be evidence of zodiacal awareness. Their study was published in the Athens Journal of History.

Like any bold claim made of early humans which challenges long-held archeological timelines, this latest theory has unsurprisingly sparked controversy with some of Sweatman and Coombs’ colleagues who have labeled their method flawed.

According to their model, prehistoric men from the Stone Age discovered the precession of the equinoxes some 36 thousand years before Hipparchus – a bold claim to say the least!

But findings such as this seem to continually piece together disparate pieces of a puzzle that modern archeology has glossed over or ignored entirely. And as Graham Hancock likes to say upon the discovery of new paradigms like this may be, “things just keep getting older.”

 

For more on the anomalous archeological finds cluing us into our forgotten past, check out this episode of Disclosure with Graham Hancock:



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Evidence the Knights Templar Migrated to Brazil

In the heart of Brazil lies a cave with carvings that may rewrite history. Long before Columbus set foot in the New World, a Medieval society had already taken root. Now researchers are looking for what drove this group across the Atlantic Ocean. 

What were they in search of, and what secrets do they now offer the world? A new documentary titled, “The Brazilian Templars Mystery,” sheds light on one of the most overlooked clues to our past and one of the most intriguing and misunderstood cult of warriors — the Knights Templar.

Around 1118 A.D., Hugues de Payens, a French knight, created a military order, along with eight relatives and acquaintances, who became known as the Knights Templar. The order grew rapidly into a large organization of devout Christians during the Middle Ages, charged with an important mission: to protect European travelers on their pilgrimage to the Holy Land and carry out military operations that would ensure a free flow of unhindered pilgrims. 

The members of this colorful order of knights swore oaths of poverty and chastity and wore a distinctive badge bearing a red cross on a white mantle. As pilgrimages grew in intensity, so did the numbers of Templars until they became Medieval Christendom’s leading military order.

Over time, the Templars gained a reputation as a wealthy, powerful, and mysterious order that was well-known for their activities as droves of travelers made their way to the holy sites of Jerusalem. When Christian armies wrested control of Jerusalem in 1099 A.D., the Templars opened the floodgates for more and more pilgrims to join. 

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