Woman Says She Was Visited by Yowies, The Bigfoot of the Outback

Bigfoot Cania Gorge Queensland Australia

Legends of Yowies have been told for centuries in Australia, including one woman who says she was visited by Yowies who left her gifts of flowers and macadamia nuts.

Like the American Bigfoot, the Yowie has become a popular campfire tale, prodded into mainstream lore with home videos taken by camping families and outdoor enthusiasts. And it’s from this alleged evidence that many have based their opinions as to whether or not Yowies exist. But it may be a bit hasty to dismiss the existence of this creature as outlandish, as the Yowie, unbeknownst to most, actually has prominence among the Aborigines, who say they’ve coexisted with them for centuries.

What is a Yowie? The Australian Bigfoot…

Many cultures have their versions of the Yowie, including the American Sasquatch (or Bigfoot), the Yeti (or Abominable Snowman) of the Himalayas, and the Brazilian Mapinguari. These are all creatures described as bipedal, larger than the average human, and covered in hair like an ape.

Interestingly enough, those who do believe these creatures exist also say that they’re likely to be close relatives of one another.

As with many entities that mystify modern civilizations, the existence of such creatures is widely accepted as fact among indigenous cultures who’ve lived on the land and have intimately known of their existence since ancient times.

The Kuku Yalanji tribe of North Queensland Australia have identified two tribes of Yowies, and point to long, detailed records of Yowie attacks in their legends. One group is described as between six- and 10-feet tall, about 1,000 pounds, and covered in thick hair. They’re also said to have talons for fingers.

This type is referred to as the “Yahoo.” The other Yowie group, known as the “Junjudees,” are believed to be smaller, around three- to four feet tall.

Both types have been documented on cave walls…

Though Aborigines claim these creatures are real, they also regard them as mystical, referring to their magical powers. They’ve equated the Yowies with a figure from their own mythology, the Doolagahl (or “hairy man”), which they believe has existed since the dawn of time.

Yowie

A statue of a Yowie in Brisbane

Mystery of the Sphinx

Yowie Sightings — Is the Australian Sasquatch Credible?

It is said that Yowies don’t appear to skeptics, which seems like a rather convenient excuse for not being able to encounter one if you are, in fact, a skeptic. And so, while skeptics haven’t found any evidence solid enough to change their minds, including expeditions they’ve taken to hunt for these creatures in the wilderness, there are nevertheless hundreds of Yowie sightings on record.

When the First Fleet of eleven British ships arrived in Sydney Cove in 1788 filled with convicts to be deposited on Australian soil and left to settle there, the Aborigines warned them of the Yowies. Only a year later, the new arrivals had their first encounter when returning from a hunting trip. They reported that a large, ape-like figure twice the size of a man was watching them from the trees at the top of a nearby hill.

The next significant sighting was made by several people in Southern Australia — the first in that region — in 1849. They described an ape-like creature between six and seven feet tall who was spotted sitting at the edge of a lake.

And then there’s the 1936 photograph, taken by Rich Jones in New South Wales, that remains highly contested. It is a depiction of two men sitting on a wooden log, and behind them a gigantic figure is sitting with its hands in its lap, chin to chest, looking downward.

Recent sightings have been made as well, though they’re subjected to even greater scrutiny and skepticism. One woman claims she developed a sort-of relationship with a family of Yowies who would visit her property. What began with her standing guard over her porch all night, brandishing a plank of wood with a screw sticking out of it, became almost friendly after she began leaving offerings of meat and vegetables outside for them. Eventually, the gesture was reciprocated, and they began leaving her gifts of macadamia nuts, flowers, and even a dead rat on her back porch. 

There are countless tales all over the world telling of legendary creatures visiting our civilizations, living among us, interacting with us, and finding a way to escape extinction in the face of human intrusion. Who’s to say such creatures don’t exist? The claim that they may live in another realm of existence, such as Aborigines have said, is not strictly held by those whose cultures accept these claims. The Epoch Times reported, “Modern physicists recognize the possible existence of several other dimensions, and how those dimensions may interact with our own is still far from understood. Some say the yowie may exist in another dimension or realm.”

The Legend of Bigfoot

Countless Bigfoot Sightings in Colorado Tracked at Sasquatch Outpost

If you perform a Google search for the term “Bigfoot” or “Sasquatch,” on any given day it’s likely you’ll find at least a few articles published within the past week. Sasquatch has become so ingrained in our culture, arguably more than any other cryptid, to the point that if it somehow isn’t real, we’ve practically willed it into existence.

Beyond its cultural acceptance, there’s actually overwhelming evidence of the reality of such a creature that spans centuries of sightings and lore throughout myriad cultures. Jim Meyers, a professional Sasquatch seeker and owner of the Sasquatch Outpost in Bailey, CO, cites the fact that nearly every Native American tribe has its own epithet for Sasquatch. 

The Navajo call it “Ye’ Iitsoh,” meaning “Big God”; the Cherokee call it “Ketleh-Kudleh,” meaning “Hairy Savage”; and the Lakota-Sioux call it “Chiye-Tanka” meaning “Big Elder Brotha.”

Often, Native Americans refer to Sasquatch as another tribe or another people, rather than a species of ape or animal, Meyers says. And this near-universal acceptance of such a creature by indigenous peoples who have inhabited remote areas of the US, centuries before its modern development, is one of the most compelling pieces of evidence for the existence of Sasquatch in his opinion.

Though Sasquatch has assimilated into our modern mythological zeitgeist, it can be found in a number of cultural traditions across the world—on nearly every continent, in fact.

Known as the Yeti, Yeren, Yowie, or the pejorative Abominable Snowman, tales of a large, hairy bipedal creature can be found in Australia, Asia, Europe, and both Americas. Interestingly though, Meyers says he’s not familiar with any instances of Sasquatch sightings in Africa, which is also where he lived much of his life.

Meyers grew up in Africa, as his parents were missionaries—a career path he would follow in his adulthood. Having moved to Kenya at age 11, he went to boarding school before attending college in the US. Feeling a desire to continue his parents’ work, Myers would spend another 20 years working as a missionary in Senegal, followed by a decade spent in France. Eventually, he returned to the states and settled in Bailey.

While he was always fascinated with Bigfoot, ever since he saw “The Legend of Boggy Creek” as a kid, Meyers said it wasn’t until a local businesswoman in Bailey recounted a very credible sighting she experienced in the area. Shortly thereafter, Animal Planet recorded an episode of Finding Bigfoot in Bailey, adding to Meyers’ interest, and the rest was history…

Searching for a new avenue of business to pursue, and hearing multitudes of stories and eyewitness sightings in the area, Meyers decided to open a Sasquatch museum in his small Colorado township in 2014. It’s now become a tourist hotspot with over 36,000 visits.

At the Sasquatch Outpost, Meyers has curated his ongoing research into the Sasquatch Encounter Museum where one finds recordings of the creature’s vocalizations, examples of the ways in which it bends, and snaps tree branches, and plaster casts of its footprints.

One of those casts happens to be from the most famous and credible Bigfoot sighting of all time: the Patterson-Gimlin film from 1967. While some skeptics claim the clip has been debunked and a deathbed confession of a hoax was made, Meyers is quick to correct that as a fallacy, pointing out that he’s talked with Patterson’s wife who said he maintained the veracity of the film up until his death.

And if that weren’t enough, Meyers has also kept a map of various levels of Sasquatch sightings and interactions people have reported experiencing throughout Colorado at the Outpost. On the map are various colored pins based on the type of encounter experienced: red denotes a visual sighting; yellow indicates tree breaks and bends; green indicates a vocalization or tree knocking; blue identifies a rock or item thrown at someone.

If you’ve had a Bigfoot encounter in Colorado, you may be able to contribute to this growing map of over 300 encounters. In the meantime, check out Meyers in the latest episode of Beyond Belief.

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