A Mexican Scientist Has Cured HPV With Oxygen and Light Frequency

Cells of human find with microscope in cytology laboratory.

A group of Mexican researchers have found a breakthrough treatment for Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, the sexually transmitted virus responsible for 95 percent of cervical cancer. But unlike most treatments for carcinogenic infections, the team implemented a non-invasive photodynamic therapy that uses oxygen and light frequencies to destroy cancerous tissues.

According to a report in a major Mexican news publication, El Universal, a research team at Mexico’s National Polytechnic Institute led by Eva Ramón Gallegos, was able to completely eliminate HPV in 29 patients in a study conducted in Mexico City.

While this appears to be their first success with treatment in official clinical trials, Ramón said she has been studying its effects for 20 years and used it to successfully treat hundreds of patients. She said she has treated 420 patients in Oaxaca and Veracruz in addition to the recent group of 29.

“During the first stage of the investigation, when it was used to treat women in Oaxaca and Veracruz, the results were encouraging. The treatment was also very positive when applied to women in Mexico City, which opens the possibility of making the treatment more efficient,” she said.

According to her study, Ramón said she eliminated HPV in 100 percent of patients with the virus who had no premalignant lesions – a condition associated with the onset of cancer. For patients with HPV and premalignant lesions she eliminated the virus in 64.3 percent of subjects, and eliminated precancerous lesions in 57.2 percent of those with just lesions but no HPV.

Dr. Ramón and her team. Photo courtesy National Polytechnic Institute

 

Photodynamic therapy implements a drug called a “photosensitizer,” or a photosensitizing agent, with a light source. When the agent is exposed to certain light frequencies it produces a type of oxygen that destroys cancer cells within close proximity.

The treatment involves the injection of the agent into the bloodstream where it is absorbed by cells throughout the body, remaining in cancer cells longer than in normal cells. Doctors then expose those cancerous cells to light, which produces a type of oxygen that subsequently destroys them.

Photodynamic treatment has been recognized by the NIH’s National Cancer Institute for its efficacy in treating esophageal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, though this appears to be the first time it has been used for treating HPV and cervical cancer.

Unlike chemotherapy and other invasive treatments for cancer or precancerous conditions, the photodynamic treatment has no negative side effects on nearby healthy cells.

According to the NIH, this type of photodynamic treatment is only effective for treating cancerous tumors just below the skin or on the lining of internal organs, as the light can only penetrate about a third of an inch deep. However, there is another treatment, known as extracorporeal photopheresis, that implements a machine to collect a patient’s blood cells and expose them to photodynamic treatment outside the body, before replacing them in the patient.

Alternative views on cancer treatments have long heralded the idea that natural processes such as light, oxygen, and sound frequency have the ability to fight cancer without exposing our bodies to radiation and other toxins that cause residual damage to healthy cells.

Now that photodynamic treatment is being pioneered to treat viruses and carcinogens, hopefully it will receive further attention and funding for more rigorous and alternative applications.

Theories and Treatments for Cancer


The Mysterious Death of Stanley Meyer and His Water-Powered Car

Since the advent of the automobile, manufacturers have designed different engines to limit the environmental impact posed by the millions of pounds of carbon emissions cars generate annually. Among these are ethanol, natural gas, electricity, and even propane. But perhaps the least-known of these is the car that was said to run on water. And that may be because its inventor, Stanley Meyer, was murdered shortly after he patented his breakthrough.

Stan Meyer’s Car With a Water-Powered Engine

Meyer’s invention promised a revolution in the automotive industry. It worked through an electric water fuel cell, which divided any kind of water — including salt water — into its fundamental elements of hydrogen and oxygen, by utilizing a process far simpler than the electrolysis method.

Despite skepticism about the legitimacy of a car that runs on water, Meyer was able to patent his invention under Section 101 of the Subject Matter Eligibility Index, meaning he proved to a patent review board that his invention worked reliably.

Meyer’s water-powered engine was the result of 20 years of research and dedication, and he claimed it was capable of converting tap water into enough hydrogen fuel to drive his car from one end of the country to the other. His invention was mind-boggling and promised a future of non-polluting vehicles that could be refueled with a garden hose.

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