Novak Djokovic Credits Diet For His Success

novak3 2

One of the familiar faces in TRANSCENDENCE, the new 5 part docu-series coming exclusively to FMTV, is 14 time Grand Slam tennis champion, Novak Djokovic. In Episode 1, titled ‘What’s In Our Food?’, Novak shares how a change to his diet was the catalyst to his 2011 comeback.

In his deeply personal interview, Djokovic shares his struggles on and off the court, which lead him to go down to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga at the 2010 Australian Open. From respiratory problems, an inability to cope with the heat, endurance problems, blurry vision, and a slew of other performance issues, Djokovic was fighting a losing battle with himself.

“I’ve experienced, prior to 2010 Australian Open, many struggles on the court… even though I was training hard, I felt like I was losing that fuel in my tank,” he shares.

Embarking on a life-changing journey with the help of fellow Serb, Dr. Igor Cetojevic, Djokovic found the best fuel for his body, and he hasn’t looked back since. The results were swift and impactful, with the tennis star winning ten tournaments and being crowned world number 1 within the next 12 months.

Transcendence graphic footer

Since then, Djokovic has spent 223+ weeks at number 1 and amassed 14 Grand Slam titles. He’s also the first person since 1969 to win all four major Grand Slams in one year, and win all 11 ATP 1000 masters events.

“I just needed that information about the change in diet and nutrition. With that change in 2010 and the years after that, I felt so strong as a tennis player… the horizons of my life opened up to me. The circumstances in life that I’ve had after that were phenomenal,” he says.

Novak Djokovic’s powerful story is just one of many in Episode 1, including experts like Bruce Lipton, Mark Hyman, Vani Hari, William Davis, and more. And don’t forget, this is only the first episode of 5, there is so much more inspiration to come.



The Herb Purslane Is A Nutritional Powerhouse

portulaca oleracea

The lovely, moist succulent known as purslane, is 93% water, features dark magenta stems, and rich green, rounded leaves. Also known as Portulaca oleracea, this nutritious, edible weed has collected some colorful nicknames over the years, including: little hogweed, pigweed, and fatweed.

A first-century historian named “Pliny the Elder” suggested that Romans used purslane as the primary vegetable during dinners and as a crunchy addition to salads. Some 18th-century French farmers were known to hate the plant, saying “it’s a mischievous weed meant for pigs.” The herb can be found in Africa, North America, Asia, and Australia. 

Some say that Europe is purslane’s native home, but given its succulence, it most likely originated nearer to deserts. The plant has been native to India, Greece, and Persia for centuries, but may have first appeared in North Africa some 4,000 years ago. Some archeologists suggest the plant is prehistoric. Slightly sour and infused with nuanced flavors akin to watercress and spinach, the fleshy purslane is loved by millions throughout the world. 

This jade-like plant can be sautéed, juiced, boiled, pickled, drenched in butter, or featured in a delicious salad with oil, salt, and vinegar. It’s a versatile weed that can be grabbed from the Earth and immediately consumed. As it’s often found in plentiful heaps strewn across the countryside, the plant is easy to grow and has provided helpful sustenance throughout the ages, especially during times of famine.

“I have made a satisfactory dinner on several accounts, simply off a dish of purslane, which I gathered in my cornfield, boiled, and salted.” — Henry Thoreau

Read Article

More In Alternative Health

Our unique blend of yoga, meditation, personal transformation, and alternative healing content is designed for those seeking to not just enhance their physical, spiritual, and intellectual capabilities, but to fuse them in the knowledge that the whole is always greater than the sum of its parts.


Use the same account and membership for TV, desktop, and all mobile devices. Plus you can download videos to your device to watch offline later.

Desktop, laptop, tablet, phone devices with Gaia content on screens

Discover what Gaia has to offer.

Testing message will be here