Yoga for Better Sex: Bring Your Practice into the Bedroom

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Do you love sex (and yoga)? Explore yoga poses for better sex and tips on how to improve one of the most important aspects of your well-being, your love life.

It’s natural to let inhibitions like fear, self-criticism and doubt take away the pleasure of one of the most satisfying things you can do with your loved one.

These yoga poses for better sex will help you improve your flexibility, ability to breathe fully, and strength, as well as teach you to be more in tune with your partner. To open your heart is to open your body and with these movements, you will learn what it is like to both give yourself to another and be open to receiving.

Tone and Open Your Pelvic Floor

In a 48-minute video on how to gain sovereignty over your sexuality taught by instructor Ashleigh Sergeant that focuses on bringing energy into the pelvic-floor region through the act of opening and toning. In these yoga poses for better sex, the focus is awareness, particularly on the energetic awareness of the pelvic floor.

“Other forms of movement and exercise don’t necessarily target areas of the pelvis,” says yoga teacher and founder of Hamna Shida Yoga in Venice, California, Molly Mitchell-Hardt. “With sex, you’re going to want blood flow in the pelvic region and the whole body. Even Warrior One helps bring blood flow to the pelvis.”

Now Begins Your Yogasmic Journey

In a sexy 22-minute video, embark on a yogasmic journey taught by instructor Hemalayaa Behl. This practice focuses on opening up your inner channels with liberating movement and sound. It teaches you as a practitioner to let go of those inhibitions that you’re holding onto and gives you a chance to scream like a monkey. You might want to get your wild animal on alone for this video.

“In yoga, we sensitize ourselves to ourselves. We often try to desensitize ourselves in life, but in yoga, we are aware of breath, movement and sensation.”

Molly Mitchell-Hardt

Finding Balance and Creativity in Your Sacral Chakra

Learn how to create freedom in this relaxing 73-minute video taught by instructor Faith Hunter that focuses on the power of the second chakra, known most commonly as the Sacral Chakra. This creative energy center, governed by the element of water and located in the pelvis, near the sacrum, promotes our ability to enjoy life in physical ways.

“The second chakra is our creative center. It creates life, birth ideas and brings dreams to reality. It is the passageway into the ovaries and testicles. Your whole reproductive center is attached to the second chakra.”

Molly Mitchell-Hardt

Pranayama Breathing and the Holistic Benefits of Yoga

Explore tantric yoga in this gentle 51-minute video taught by instructor Pedro Franco that focuses on the breath and helps to activate the chakra system and kundalini energies within the body. You’re going to want to find a quiet space for this video so that you can focus on the sound of your breath in silence.

“Sit cross-legged in a comfortable seated position and create circles with your chest. This evokes sensuality but also awakens the root chakra. You have to wake up the root to wake up everything else.”

Molly Mitchell-Hardt

Yoga for Improving Your Sexual Health

Learn how to improve your sexual health in this fun 44-minute video taught by instructor Jesse Enright that focuses on movement, mobility and strength. Through a series of energetic practices, you will learn muscular control, body intelligence and how to channel sexual energy.

Strengthen Your Pelvic Floor Through Kundalini

Awaken your sexual side in this 31-minute Kundalini-inspired video taught by instructor Lindsey Lewis that focuses on the second chakra. You will learn how to tap into the power and awareness of Kundalini energy, which is often associated with the divine energy of Tantra, the idea of being “woven together” with God through both the physical and spiritual.

“Yoga is an opportunity to fall in love with yourself, not in a narcissistic way, but in a truly genuine way. It is an opportunity to enjoy yourself. As an extension of that, you can only truly enjoy the company of someone else in a fully uninhibited way.”

Molly Mitchell-Hardt

Strengthen Your Lower Core

Find your roots and dig deep in this foundational 26-minute video taught by instructor Cameron Gilley that focuses on strengthening and opening the Root Chakra. The Root Chakra is the first energy center of the body and is affiliated with the adrenal glands. In this video, you will complete a hatha flow and spend a lot of time focusing on the basics, working on finding balance and creating stability by charging up the power center of your body.

Get Your Om On and Optimize Your Sexual Pleasure

Enliven your sex life with this essential 46-minute video taught by instructor Samantha S. Brown, where you will bring attention to your heart’s center. Learning how to breathe through your pelvis and open your back, you will see how connection to nature and others comes from the inside out. Opening your lower back will offer you a greater capacity for pleasure.

“Fluid, liquid movements of the spine provoke sensuality.”

Molly Mitchell-Hardt

Become More Tuned In to Your Sexual Experience

Tune into your sexual experience with synchronicity in this subtle 23-minute video taught by instructor Ashley Turner, opening your body to range of motion and allowing you to become more tuned in to your sexual experience. You will be guided to understand the difference between having sex and making love. Through self-love and awareness, learn how to be a more generous lover and become more open to receiving love.

Feel Good in Your Own Body

Find the constant orgasm in this empowering 73-minute video taught by instructor Meghan Currie. In this sultry sequence, you will learn the power of feeling good in your own body and how being in the moment allows you to better connect with another. Be prepared to bend, tone, sweat and build stamina for a rockin’ sex life.

“Sex can feel very primal and animalistic, but we are also able to make love and unite in a deeper way.”

Molly Mitchell-Hardt

Beginner Level Partner Yoga

Explore partner yoga in this awakening 26-minute video taught by instructor Pedro Franco. You will learn how to connect with another through this beginner partner sequence. Get a greater sense of your own alignment through the movements of your partner. Play with a friend or loved one in this fun, introductory video.

In the name of love and better sex, build connection and intimacy with the yoga!



What is Tantra Yoga?

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If the word Tantra conjures up scenes of sexuality, you’re not alone. The introduction of Tantric practices in the West has inadvertently become identified with a practice that’s laced with nudity, sexuality, and occasionally, promiscuity.

The truth is, Tantra may enhance your sex life, but only by deepening your connection to your energy and your body first. Although Tantric practices are founded on the principle of intimacy, intimacy is not purely physical. It’s the act of connecting so deeply that you feel as if you are getting a glimpse into your and perhaps another’s soul.

I’ve heard it described as “into me I see” based on the premise that we must gain an awareness of our true selves before we can forge the path of union with others.

What’s the point of Tantra Yoga?

The purpose of Tantra Yoga, is to further emotional wellbeing, aiding spiritual and physical health.

The exploration of the subtle energies within the body and their connection to the universe provide the opportunity to understand the purpose of life and the principles of union in new dimensions.

Rod Stryker, a prominent teacher of Tantra Yoga, describes the intention of Tantra Yoga, “(it) shows us what is blocking us from thriving and offers techniques that will help us attain spiritual and material prosperity.” Hence the goals of the Tantric practices are to enable us to prosper, to thrive and to merge the spiritual world and the material world into one.

What is Tantra Yoga?

The word Tantra means, “to weave or expand.” The root of the word yoga is “yuj” which means, “union.” Similar to some of the other 8 Forms of Yoga, Tantra Yoga blends elements of Raja, Bhakti, Karma, Kundalini, and Hatha practices. What distinguishes it from others is that it also weaves dynamics of other mystical practices as well such as: astrology, Ayurveda, crystals, and gemology to name a few. In utilizing these aspects, the Tantric practice aims to expand beyond perceived limitations of yogic philosophy and the asanas.

The comprehensive approach of Tantra Yoga incorporates conscious breathing practices, pranayama, and meditation, and may be practiced individually or in partnership with another. In both practices, the relationship between the micro (self) and the macro (others) is enhanced.

Vinyasa, as a moving meditation through postures, or asanas, also may be practiced partnering, as a blending of energies or as a sole practitioner. The aim is the same: to gain awareness of our strengths and weaknesses, the places where we resist union with ourselves and others, and cultivate the ability to consciously respond rather than unconsciously react to both our fears and desires. When that occurs, we reach a state of eternal bliss.

Five Tantra Yoga Practices

1. Peace Pose with Pranayam, Conscious Breathing

Begin in a cross-legged seated position, Sukhasana, or peace pose. Gaze down; if knees are higher than hip creases, sit on a yoga block or rolled up yoga mat to elevate the spine.

For solo practice, place hands in gyan mudra (also referred to as jnana mudra in some practices) with the tip of the index finger touching the tip of the thumb, extending out the other three fingers with the palms facing up and resting on knees or thighs. Gyan mudra, a yogic shape for the hands, is considered the prime mudra with many health and grounding benefits.

If practicing with a partner, sit back to back in peace pose, sukhasana. You’ll want to align your spines: start by scooting your seats as close to one another as possible. Option to use prithvi mudra, tips of the ring fingers touching the tips of the thumbs, remaining three fingers outstretched but relaxed. This mudra creates a circuitry igniting the heart meridian, or line of energy that extends from the ring fingers, extends up through the arms and confluences at heart center in both the front and backside of the chest.

Take five full breaths, focusing on smoothing out the length of the inhale to match the same length on the exhale.

2. Sun Salutations, Surya Namaskar

Start in mountain pose (tadasana/urdhva hastasana), standing at the top of your yoga mat. As an individual practice, you may like to practice facing a full-length mirror. In a partner practice, you could either practice facing one another or side by side. Bring palms to meet at heart center in anjali mudra (prayer gesture) or place one hand on your heart, and one on your partner’s heart. Take five deep breaths.

Extend arms overhead, mountain pose, then bow forward, keeping your heart open and gaze forward, and release your head into a forward fold (uttanasana). Bring hands to shins or thighs and lengthen through your spine for a halfway lift (ardha uttanasana). Repeat three times.

3. Modified Side Plank/ Partner Modified Side Plank Pose

Start in table pose, wrists aligned under shoulders, hands spread wide, and hips stacked over knees. For partner modified plank pose, you can lightly touch the crown of the head with one another while in table. Then extend your right shins behind you, toes curled under as you root right hand into the mat and open your chests towards one another.

For an individual practice, bring your left hand to rest over your heart as you stack your left shoulder over right so your heart is wide open. Your hips are also stacked creating a beautiful opening for what are considered our more vulnerable energetic centers: hips and hearts. In partner practice, connect left palms overhead. Enjoy five breaths. Return to table and then switch sides.

4. Partner Peace Pose, Entwined Sukhasana

Come into a loose, cross-legged position (typically the larger person in sukhasana first). Your partner then sits on your thighs and crosses their ankles behind your back. Touch your third eye centers (space between the eyebrows) as you both lengthen through your spines. You may choose to close your eyes or gaze lightly into each other’s eyes as you inhale and exhale through the nose. Take five breaths, allowing a natural synchronicity of breath, with your palms resting on the backside of your partner’s heart. Surrender to the intimate experience of both your and your partner’s heartbeat.

5. Child’s Pose (Balasana), Partner Child’s Pose

Bring your knees wide to the edges of your mat, fold forward resting your forehead on the mat, arms extended overhead but resting on the mat. (If knees are sensitive, you can place the folded edges of a blanket behind your knees before folding forward or rest your seat and perhaps forehead on yoga blocks.) If shoulders allow, bring your palms to touch in prayer, symbolic of union with all aspects of yourself.

For partner child’s pose, assume the same shape described above, with heads pointed towards one another. With arms outstretched, you can place your left palm down, and your palm up to connect with your partner’s palms. It’s said that our hands are an extension of our hearts. Envision your inhale emerging from your left palm, breathing in the essence of your partner, and exhaling through your right palm, sharing your essence with your partner.

For a more advanced practice, presuming both partners have healthy knees and spines, you may like to have one partner (typically the larger partner) stay in child’s pose, and the other, sit facing the opposite direction, on the low back of the partner in child’s pose. Slowly, keeping weight in your feet, begin to lower down, using the support of hands on the mat alongside the bottom partner’s hips. Eventually, lower your spine to align with the partner in child’s pose, and relax arms alongside, or extend your arms overhead, sliding palms underneath your partner’s palms.

Stay in close communication with your partner in child’s pose to ensure that each of the actions feels safe and available in their body.

Expand Your Capacity For Intimacy

If you’re practicing Tantra Yoga on your own or with a partner, you’re expanding your capacity for intimacy and union. With practice, we’re able to get up close and intimate with the beliefs and behaviors that hold us back from the intimacy we desire. In addition, Tantric techniques are provided to evolve beyond these barriers so that each and every one of us may thrive and prosper.

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